Student Health Center hosts annual college health association conference

The University of Alabama Student Health Center hosted the 2013 Southern College Health Association Conference at the Baytowne Conference Center in Sandestin, Fla., April 17-20. The Student Health Center is operated by the College.

Several faculty and staff of the College were involved in the planning of the conference including eight SCHA Executive Planning Committee members and nine SCHA/ACHA Program Planning Committee members. In addition, CCHS faculty and staff presented nine different breakout sessions at the conference on topics ranging from tanning beds and their link to melanoma to insurance billing in a student health center.

2013 SCHA Conference 074[1]“Ride Your Wave and Chart Your Course” was the theme of this year’s conference.  “We are focusing on the needs of the individuals and their colleges and universities as we chart the course to improve the services of student health care,” says John Maxwell, SCHA president-elect.

The SCHA, a regional affiliate of the American College Health Association, is a professional organization that colleges and universities join to work together to promote health, including preventive and health promotion programs, on behalf of their students. The annual conference supports this mission and strives to enhance, through presentations, lectures, panel discussions and formal and informal networking opportunities, the ability of college health professional to provide quality care.

This year’s conference included several networking opportunities, vendor exhibits and more than 30 different breakout sessions and featured three keynote speakers: C.M.A. “Max” Rogers IV, MD; Ivana Grahovac, MSW; and Len Kravitz, PhD.

Rogers, a former fighter pilot in the United States Marine Corps and an obstetrician and gynecologist, combines his previous military experience in the “high reliability” world of military fighters with his practice of medicine to concentrate on patient safety and quality improvement. 

At the conference, he provided a talk titled “Systematic Approach to Providing High Reliability Health Care in the Age of Customer Service.” Rogers says that high reliability teams and processes are absolutely necessary and “our only hope for achieving flawless health care.”

Grahovac is director of the Center for Students in Recovery at the University of Texas at Austin and is leading the first university system-wide expansion of collegiate recovery to the eight other University of Texas system institutions. At the conference, Grahovac shared tips on “Building Sustainable, Welcoming, and Inclusive Collegiate Recovery Communities.”

Kravitz, a health and fitness expert, presented an address titled “Exercise – The Magic Bullet,” where he spoke about the updated physical activity guidelines for health, the benefits of regular exercise and strategies to help clients and patients adhere to exercise programs. 

Kravitz has served as the coordinator of Exercise Science at the Department of Health, Exercise and Sports Sciences at the University of New Mexico since 1999. He is recognized internationally for his contributions to the fitness and health industry and is a published author. 

The SCHA’s membership includes 137 universities and colleges in the Southeastern states of Alabama, Georgia, Florida, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Mississippi, as well as schools from the West Indies, Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico.

Next year, the conference will be hosted by the Georgia Institute of Technology and held in Atlanta, Ga.

College hosts Research Day

The College hosted its Fifth Annual CCHS Research Day on April 24. The event gave the faculty, residents, staff, medical students and graduate students an opportunity to display their collaborative research efforts and inform each other and The University of Alabama of their findings.

research5Among the presenters was Caroline Boxmeyer, PhD, who won first place in the faculty division for her research on “Improving Self-regulation in Preschool Children: Physiological Moderation of Preventive Intervention Effects.” Boxmeyer is an associate professor in the College’s Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine and a research scientist at The University of Alabama’s Center for Prevention of Youth Behavior Problems.

“There is increased recognition that the best way we can help children prepare for school and for life is not just to teach them the ABCs but to help them learn to manage their own feelings and behaviors, to understand the feelings of others and to be able to work well with others,” Boxmeyer says. “Our study was an effort to teach parents what the children were learning in the classroom and to help parents learn to reinforce these behaviors at home.”

The study showed a positive impact on children’s behavior and the classroom environment and also changed children’s physiological responses to stress as a result of the program.

Jessica Powell of Samantha, Ala., won first place in the undergraduate and graduate student division for her research on “Developing a Standard of Universal Postpartum Depression Screening in the Rural Primary Care Setting.” Powell is a first-year medical student at The University of Alabama School of Medicine in Birmingham and a Rural Medical Scholar with the College.

The Rural Medical Scholars program is a program of the Department of Community and Rural Medicine at the College and its mission is to produce physicians for rural Alabama who are leaders in developing healthy communities. The program is for college seniors or graduate students and is a five-year track of medical studies that leads to a certificate or master’s degree from The University of Alabama and a medical degree from The University of Alabama School of Medicine.

Among medical students, Paige Ivey Partain was awarded first place for her research in “The Associations between Health Risk Behaviors, Executive Function Deficits, and ADHD Symptoms in University Students.” Partain had a particular interest in pursuing research in Pediatrics. She worked on the project with Mark Thomas, MD, a physician in the College’s Student Health Center and faculty member in the College’s Department of Pediatrics, and Ilya Gutman, an undergraduate research assistant and pre-medical student at the University. Partain is a fourth-year medical student at the College, which is also a regional campus of The University of Alabama School of Medicine, headquartered in Birmingham.

The poster presentations were judged based on four criteria, including experience, skill and knowledge gained; effective use of critical thinking; clarity of expression; and originality. The judges were Stuart Usdan, PhD, professor and associate dean of the College of Human Environmental Sciences; Stephanie Brewer, coordinator for the School of Social Work; Robin Huebner, LCSW, PIP, instructor in the School of Social Work; and Kristin Pettey, MSW, Veterans Integrated Service Network rural consultant for the Southeast Network.

There were a total of 76 participants and 31 posters presented to make this year’s event the largest to date. The day included a poster viewing session in the afternoon followed by the Art of Research, a facilitated discussion about starting research projects at the College and campus-wide.

     

Graduating medical students honored at convocation

Thirty-one medical students who completed their third and fourth years at the College were honored May 17 at Senior Convocation, which was held at the Hotel Capstone on The University of Alabama campus.

Emad Elsamadicy (left), Senior Class President, 2012-2013, Tuscaloosa Campus, poses with Lea Yerby, PhD, assistant professor in Community and Rural Medicine, after the Senior Convocation May 17.

Emad Elsamadicy (left), Senior Class President, 2012-2013, Tuscaloosa Campus, poses with Lea Yerby, PhD, assistant professor in Community and Rural Medicine, after the Senior Convocation May 17.

The College provides the last two years of clinical training for a portion of medical students enrolled at the University of Alabama School of Medicine, which is headquartered in Birmingham. The 31 students were among 169 who graduated from the School of Medicine during a ceremony in Birmingham on May 19.

Members of the College’s Class of 2013 were introduced at the convocation by Cathy Gresham, MD, the College’s associate dean for Medical Student Affairs, and Heather Taylor, MD, associate director of Medical Student Affairs. “I don’t think we could be prouder of a group of physicians we are sending out into the world,” Taylor said.

The convocation keynote address was given by Tuscaloosa Mayor Walter Maddox, who recalled that during the 2011 tornado that devastated the city, average citizens came together and helped one another. “The people we serve are often teaching us lessons that we can hold dear for the rest of our lives,” he said.  

 Awards were also presented:

Awards Given by Academic Departments

Robert F. Gloor Award in Community Medicine, for excellent performance in Community and Rural Medicine – Emad Elsamadicy, MD

Family Medicine Award, for excellence in Family Medicine – Jason Clemons, MD

William W. Winternitz Award in Internal Medicine, for outstanding achievement in Internal Medicine during the third and fourth year – Chris Rigell, MD      

Neurology Award, for outstanding academic and clinical performance during the Neurology Clerkship – Brooke Bell, MD

Pediatrics Recognition Award, for outstanding interest and ability in helping parents and their children reach their full personal, social and educational potential – Adam Scott, MD

Adolescent Medicine Recognition Award, for recognition of interest and skill in working with the adolescent population – Shaundra Harris Blakemore, MD

Peter Bryce Award in Psychiatry, for excellence exhibited by a medical student both academically and clinically during his/her Psychiatry Clerkship – Kevin Greer, MD, and Chris Rigell, MD

Finney / Akers Memorial Award in Obstetrics and Gynecology, for outstanding academic and clinical success in Obstetrics and Gynecology – Emad Elsamadicy, MD, and Krishna Shah, MD

Dr. William R. Shamblin Surgery Award, for the highest scholastic achievement during the third-year Surgery Clerkship – Jessica Grayson, MD, and Chris Rigell, MD

Glasgow-Rubin Citation for Academic Achievement, awarded by the American Medical Women’s Association to recognize female class members graduating in the top 10 percent of their class – Jessica Grayson, MD

Larry Mayes Memorial Award, for a rising senior to complete an international elective or an elective in an underserved area of this country – Brittney Anderson, MD

Student Research Award, to recognize the pursuit of one or more research projects leading to a presentation or publication during the clinical years of medical training – Kevin Greer, MD

Scholastic Achievement Award, for superior performance in the clinical curriculum – Chris Rigell, MD

William R. Willard Award, for outstanding contributions to the goals and mission of the College of Community Health Sciences as voted by the College faculty – Chris Rigell, MD

Magna Cum Laude – Jessica Grayson, MD, Chris Rigell, MD

Cum Laude – Kevin Greer, MD

 

Awards Given By Students

Faculty Recognition Award (Junior Year), for outstanding contributions to undergraduate medical education during students’ junior year – Heather Taylor, MD     

Patrick McCue Faculty Recognition Award (Senior Year), for outstanding contributions to medical education during students’ senior year – A. Robert Sheppard, MD

Resident Recognition Award, for outstanding contributions to undergraduate medical education – Maury Minton, MD

James H. Akers Memorial Award, for a graduating senior to recognize dedication to the art and science of medicine as voted on by the senior class – Chris Rigell, MD.

The Next Dr. Patch Adams – Adam Scott, MD

Most Hours Logged Sleeping in a Hospital – Jonny Kentros, MD

Most Likely to Skip a Mandatory Meeting – Osameude Osemwota, MD

Most Likely to See Your Patients Before You Did – Jessica Grayson, MD

The Super Style Award, for the student who always arrived well dressed and groomed – Brandy Milstead, MD, Katie Gates, MD, and Jason Clemons, MD

Student peers get innovative with health education

The Student Health Center’s Department of Health Promotion and Wellness was recognized by the BACCHUS Network for its efforts in peer health education. The Student Health Center is operated by the College.  

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The BACCHUS Network is a university and community-based network that focuses on health and safety initiatives, including promoting healthy and safe lifestyle decisions regarding alcohol abuse, tobacco use, illegal drug use, unhealthy sexual practices and other high-risk behaviors. The network includes thousands of student leaders and advisors on more than 320 college campuses in North America.

The department’s Health Hut was recognized with the Outstanding Prevention Programming Award, which is given to only three programs based on the number of students the program reaches, the health topics it covers and its unique method of peer education. The award was presented late last year at the BACCHUS Network’s General Assembly, a national conference.

The Health Hut is a health education outreach program that provides students with prevention and intervention activities through daily outreach focused on healthy living. The hut is strategically placed at different locations on campus five days a week, 46 hours per week, and it is staffed by 41 student interns who cover a different health topic each week with an activity, game or handout. In spring 2013, the Health Hut was visited by more than 12,000 students.

The Health Hut is an initiative of Project Health, a University of Alabama student organization housed in the Department of Health Promotion and Wellness that provides the Capstone with a variety of programs aimed at increasing healthy behaviors among college students. Project Health is supervised by Jessica Vickery, MPH, CHES, an assistant director of Health Education and Promotion. Project Health also serves as a liaison between the Student Health Center and the University.

At the BACCHUS Network’s regional conference in March, Project Health’s peer health education group was selected as the most outstanding group in the region with the Outstanding Affiliate Award. The group is comprised of over 90 UA students and includes Health Hut interns, Health Ambassadors and GAMMA delegates.

The students receive training each semester and on a weekly basis about various health topics, communication, outreach and programming. This year, the Health Ambassadors developed health education programs for the University’s residence halls and continue to manage an outreach event called “Healthy Hump Day,” which is held every Wednesday at the Ferguson Student Center and focuses on national health awareness weeks and months.

In addition to the Outstanding Affliate Award, Project Health was selected for three additional awards at the regional conference in March. Kristy Sillay was selected as Outstanding Alumni. She served as a GAMMA delegate in 2010 and provided peer health education to the Greek community and the University campus. She joined Health Hut in 2011 and is now serving as a graduate assistant in the Department of Health Promotion and Wellness working with Project Health while she pursues a master’s degree in health sciences.

Sarah Chaffee, who serves as a Health Hut intern and the Project Health vice president for programming, was selected as Outstanding Student.

Vickery, advisor of the Health Hut since 2011 and the Health Ambassadors since 2012, was selected as Outstanding Advisor. She was also selected as the Alabama State Coordinator for the BACCHUS Network, responsible for connecting with other Alabama university and college peer health education groups to expand the network.

“Developing relationships with other schools allows us to look at new ways to provide our campus with peer health education as well as see what health issues different campuses are facing and how we can effectively tackle them,” Vickery says. “Peer health education is so important for our campus because it allows us to reach out to more students and expand our impact.”

Meanwhile, a new initiative of Project Health, the Swagon, recently received the Capstone Innovation Award at the 2013 SOURCE Awards. While getting a ride to class in the Student Health Center’s GEM Car, students are asked trivia questions about health topics in order to earn “swag.” SOURCE Awards recognize university student organizations.

Primary Care Scholars include 2 from Tuscaloosa Campus

Primary Care Students UABFor the half-dozen UAB School of Medicine students chosen as the inaugural Primary Care Scholars, including two from the School of Medicine’s Tuscaloosa Campus, being part of a community and providing care over the life of a patient were common motivations to enter a field that many students have turned away from in recent years.

“In primary care, you get to take care of the whole patient; you get to care for their families,” said scholar Robyn Wilson from Clay, Ala. “A lot of (chronic) illnesses wouldn’t progress to needing a specialist if you can make an impact at the primary care level.”

The American Association of Medical Colleges projects the United States will face a shortage of 45,000 primary care physicians by 2020. But Wilson, Amber Beg from Tuscaloosa, Nick Darby from Florence, Russ Guin from Brownville, Lauren Smith from Huntsville and Jessica Willis from Selma are bucking a trend of growing interest in specialties such as emergency medicine, dermatology and anesthesiology, which offer higher salaries or more stable work hours, or both.

“Primary care is about building relationships with patients,” Darby says. “I really want to go back to my hometown, and primary care is definitely an avenue to do that. I may want to work in one of the smaller communities outside of Florence. I have a lot of common interests with the people there.”

“Patients are developing an aversion to all the tests and scans (in modern medicine). That’s intimidating to a lot of patients,” Smith says. “The route to a diagnosis might be different for a primary care physician who knows the family—having followed them thought their lives, knowing what they’re doing in the community—and who is able to build trust with patients.”

The Primary Care Scholars Program is part of a larger primary care strategy designed by William Curry, MD, a former community physician who now is professor of General Internal Medicine and associate dean for Primary Care and Rural Health in the School of Medicine and senior vice president for Population Health in the UAB Health System. Curry is also a former dean of the College of Community Health Sciences, which, as a regional campus of the School of Medicine, provides the last two years of clinical training for a portion of medical students. Primary care is one of the strategic objectives of AMC 21, UAB Medicine’s quest of becoming the preferred academic medical center of the 21st Century.

The Primary Care Scholars Program’s highly selective process chose two first-year students based on merit for each of the three established campuses—Birmingham, Huntsville and Tuscaloosa. Beg and Darby are the two students chosen from the Tuscaloosa Campus. Two additional students will be chosen for the Montgomery campus after that campus begins enrolling students in 2014. The merit-based program will provide an annual scholarship of $10,000, mentoring, career modeling and academic opportunities, such as summer workshops and a summer immersion program where the students will be working in a clinical setting.  

“At UAB our goal is to provide outstanding education, training and research in primary care, in addition to our world-class work in the basic sciences and medical specialties,” says Anupam Agarwal, MD, interim senior vice president of Medicine and dean of the School of Medicine. “This program helps us accomplish our goals, and these students are demonstrating the important role UAB plays in providing health care to the people of Alabama.”

With more than 30 qualified applicants for the six spots, B. Earl Salser Jr., MD, an associate professor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine and director of the Primary Care Scholars Program, called the selected students “the top of the top.” In addition to their academic success, the students had to convey a true interest in primary care.

“The program was created to foster and encourage the students to maintain interest in primary care—family medicine, internal medicine, pediatrics and a combination of adult and pediatric medicine—throughout their four years in medical school.” Based on data, Salser says, “If there’s no exposure to primary care until the third or fourth year, the students begin to focus on other specialties and lose their initial interest in primary care fields.”

Medicine, says Beg, “is more than testing for diseases and treating symptoms. Illness doesn’t happen on a vacuum. If you’re well integrated in a community you can work with community leaders to provide better care for your patients. Primary care physicians are well positioned to do this.”

Willis said, “I want to have patients I can treat throughout their whole lives. I want to take care of the person, not just the illness. And I want to live in a rural area.”

A rural setting was also important to Guin, who selected primary care, at least in part, after shadowing a physician in Tuscaloosa. “I like being able to work with patients long-term versus a one-time interaction.”

“We hope these scholars who’ve been selected for the program will not only go on to be great primary care physicians, but we also hope they will l be leaders in the primary care field,” Salser said.

New medical students welcomed to campus

130509_MW_medical_studentsThirty-one University of Alabama School of Medicine students, who will spend their third and fourth years of clinical training at the College of Community Health Sciences, recently attended an orientation session in Tuscaloosa.

For training of medical students, the College is a regional campus of the School of Medicine, along with Huntsville and Montgomery.

Medical students complete the first two years of basic sciences courses at the Birmingham campus, where the School of Medicine is headquartered, and then choose to complete the third and fourth years of the medical school curriculum at any one of the four campuses.

At the Tuscaloosa Campus, clinical education is oriented to primary care while also providing exposure to other specialties and subspecialties.

“This marks a transition point,” Cathy Gresham, MD, director of Medical Student Affairs, told the students. “You have been introduced to clinical medicine, and you have been with and around patients. This is a transition from books and modules to being more of an apprentice. This is the next step of your journey.”

The orientation session was held on Thursday, May 2, and gave the students an opportunity to find their way around the Tuscaloosa Campus, complete paperwork and necessary training, and perhaps more importantly, glean candid advice from the campus’ current medical students.    

Since its founding, more than 750 medical students have received their third and fourth years of clinical training at the College, with more than half choosing careers in primary care.

Rural Medical Scholars glean advice from rural health expert

130121_MW_Dr. ScutchfieldDoctors who practice in rural areas must be leaders in their communities and not only care for their patients but work to address poverty, education and economic development issues, said Dr. F. Douglas Scutchfield, the Peter Bosomworth Professor of Health Services Research and Policy at the University of Kentucky College of Public Health.

“Anything that impacts patients’ health and wellbeing is the responsibility of all of us and requires you to play a role in your community,” he told students and guests during the College of Community Health Sciences’ 17th Annual Rural Health Scholars Convocation April 26 at the University of Alabama.

Scutchfield was the guest speaker at the convocation, which recognized 12 students who completed a course of study that provides certification and a master’s degree in rural community health. The course of study prepares students for further health professional training and, for some, is part of a five-year medical education track completed in the year prior to entry into medical school.

Scutchfield was also presented with the College’s Rural Medical Scholar Program Distinguished Service Award, given annually to recognize an individual’s commitment to rural health care over a career.

“I feel myself in a privileged position to be part and parcel with individuals who have been recognized before,” he said.

Scutchfield served as chair of the College’s Department of Family Medicine in 1974 and as the College’s first associate dean for Academic Affairs from 1975 to 1979. He was hired by the College’s founding dean, Dr. William R. Willard.

“Dr. Willard understood the role of communities and the importance of communities.  That’s why he wanted to create a College of Community Health Sciences,” Scutchfield said. “We were impressed with the opportunity to create rural private care physicians, and we created a group who were competent, caring physicians. We created physician leaders.”

He told the students that “you will have leadership thrust upon you. You are likely to be on the Board of Health, on the Medical board, on the state chapter of the American Academy of Family Physicians. Poverty and education are not seen as a responsibility of doctors, but it is for those who are leaders in their communities. It’s hard to exercise if there are no sidewalks, so you are the one who will need to say, ‘When a new subdivision is going up, where are the sidewalks?’ You have a responsibility to work for economic development. Your leadership role requires you to look beyond the patient in front of you, while taking good care of the patient.”

Scutchfield, who holds a faculty appointment in the University of Kentucky College of Medicine, is also director of the National Coordinating Center for Public Health Services and Systems Research, which is funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. He was the founder of the Graduate School of Public Health at San Diego State University and the School of Public Health at the University of Kentucky.

His research and teaching focuses on preventive medicine and public health. He is a former editor of several medical and preventive medicine journals and has published more than 200 journal articles, editorials, books and book chapters. He has served as president of the American College of Preventive Medicine and the Association of Teachers of Preventive Medicine.

The students recognized during the convocation include those in two of the University of Alabama College of Community Health Sciences’ rural programs—the Rural Community Health Scholars Program and the Rural Medical Scholars Program.

The Rural Community Health Scholars Program trains future Alabama health-care providers to become community health leaders. This training prepares them to help develop and maintain community health centers and other health-care practices and engage in community affairs that advance community health.

The Rural Medical Scholars Program, which is for college seniors or graduate students and, is a five-year track of medical studies that leads to a certificate or master’s degree from the University of Alabama and a medical degree from the University of Alabama School of Medicine. The program focuses on rural primary care and community medicine and gives students experiences in rural settings through field trips, service projects, research and shadowing of rural physicians.

Primary Care Scholars chosen

For the half-dozen UAB School of Medicine students chosen as the inaugural Primary Care Scholars, being part of a community and providing care over the life of a patient were common motivations to enter a field that many students have turned away from in recent years.

“In primary care, you get to take care of the whole patient, you get to care for their families,” said scholar Robyn Wilson from Clay, Ala. “A lot of (chronic) illnesses wouldn’t progress to needing a specialist if you can make an impact at the primary care level.”

The Association of American of Medical Colleges projects the United States will face a shortage of 45,000 primary care physicians by 2020. But Wilson, Amber Beg from Tuscaloosa, Nick Darby from Florence, Russ Guin from Brownville, Lauren Smith from Huntsville and Jessica Willis from Selma are bucking a trend of growing interest in specialties such as emergency medicine, dermatology and anesthesiology, which offer higher salaries or more stable work hours, or both.

Through these Doors: Changing the Face of Medicine

Fifty years after the “stand in the schoolhouse door” and the integration of the University of Alabama, the College of Community Health Sciences is looking back on the progress made in diversity in medicine and medical education by hosting a symposium on Tuesday, June 4, from 11:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. at University Church of Christ.

The public is invited to attend. There is no cost to attend the event; however, an RSVP is requested by emailing events@cchs.ua.edu.

ThroughtheDoorslogoThe symposium, Through These Doors: Changing the Face of Medicine, includes an afternoon segment with lunch from 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m., two panel sessions and a keynote address, and an evening segment with a Trailblazers recognition ceremony, dinner and a talk and a mentoring opportunity for students.

The afternoon segment begins with the first panel session, “Reviewing the History of Stand in the Schoolhouse Door,” from 12:30 p.m. to 1:45 p.m., which includes speaker Sandral Hullett, MD, CEO and medical director of Cooper Green Mercy Hospital in Birmingham, Ala., and one of the first African-American residents in the College’s Family Medicine Residency.

The second panel session, “Reviewing the History of Diversity in the College of Community Health Sciences,” from 1:55 p.m. to 3:15 p.m., includes speakers Herb Stone, MD, a family medicine physician and president and COO of Mobile Emergency Group in Mobile and one of the first African-American residents in the College’s Family Medicine Residency; Vernon Scott Sr., MD, an African-American resident during the early years of the College’s residency and a practicing physician in Tuscaloosa; Earnestine Tucker, CRNP, a nurse practitioner and former employee of the College; and Carol Johnson, MD, one of the first African-American medical students at the College who now practices in Alabaster.

The keynote address, “The Future of Diversity in Medical Education,” from 3:30 p.m. to 4:45 p.m., will be given by Jeannette South-Paul, MD, medical director of the Community Health Services Division of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and the Andrew W. Mathieson Professor and Chair of Family Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh School of Health Sciences.

The evening segment begins at 5 p.m. with a recognition ceremony for Trailblazers of the College of Community Health Sciences, followed by a dinner and talk from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. by Herb Stone, MD, titled, “So You Want To Be a Doctor.” There will also be mentoring activities for high school students who are part of the College’s Rural Health Leaders Pipeline programs.

Date: Tuesday, June 4, 2013
Time: 11:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Location: University Church of Christ, 1200 Julia Tutwiler Drive, Tuscaloosa, Ala., 35404
Sponsor: College of Community Health Sciences
Cost: Free
Contact: Dr. Pamela Payne-Foster, (205) 348-5148 or ppayne-foster@cchs.ua.edu
RSVP: Please RSVP by emailing events@cchs.ua.edu.

CCHS provides medical students with knowledge and experience

Take a look at what the College, which is also the University of Alabama School of Medicine, Tuscaloosa Campus, offers to medical students in terms of hands-on experience with patients, dedication of faculty and staff, and a vibrant student life.