• 2016 YEAR IN REVIEW

    Click through to learn how CCHS worked to meet its mission in 2016 through medical education, clinical care, community outreach and scholarship and research.

  • MINI MEDICAL SCHOOL LAUNCHES

  • MINI MEDICAL SCHOOL LAUNCHES

    Members of the Tuscaloosa community learned about dementia, stroke, diabetes, nutrition, stress relief and many other health topics as part of the Mini Medical School program—a lecture series for The University of Alabama’s OLLI program that has been put on by faculty and resident physicians at CCHS.

    Since its first lecture in January, the Mini Medical School program has let adults and community learners explore trends in medicine and health, and the lectures by CCHS faculty and residents provide information about issues and advances in medicine and research.

    The lectures are open to OLLI registrants and to the public.

    View upcoming speakers and topics
  • CRUCIFEROUS CHALLENGE GROWS IN SECOND YEAR

  • CRUCIFEROUS CHALLENGE
    GROWS IN SECOND YEAR

    For the second year in a row, the CCHS Brussels Sprout Challenge was part of the American Heart Association West Alabama Heart Walk, which was held in Feb. 13 at the Tuscaloosa Amphitheater. CCHS partnered with Manna Grocery and Deli to roast and serve more than 900 Brussels sprouts at the walk.

    Participants of the challenge had to eat one roasted Brussels sprout at each mile marker, and those who completed by eating all three were awarded a T-shirt after the walk. CCHS also provided Brussels sprout recipes and health facts to all Heart Walk participants.

    Watch the video and view coverage here
  • RURAL HEALTH CONFERENCE FOCUSES ON COMPLEMENTARY AND INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE

  • RURAL HEALTH CONFERENCE FOCUSES ON COMPLEMENTARY AND INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE

    Complementary and integrative medicine was the focus of the 17th Annual Rural Health Conference, held April 27-28 at the Bryant Conference Center on the UA campus. Hosted by CCHS and its Institute for Rural Health Research, the conference is attended by health care professionals, community leaders, researchers, government officials and policymakers interested in making a difference in rural communities.

    Dr. Geeta Maker-Clark, clinical assistant professor and coordinator of Integrative Medical Education at Pritzker School of Medicine at the University of Chicago, was one of the keynote speakers. She stressed that food is medicine.

    “When we think about medicine, we think clinics, doctors, pills and sickness,” she said. “But what about wellness, exercise, deep breathing and eating well? Doctors need to be the ones pushing forward that food is medicine.”

    Learn more about the conference
  • SENIOR CONVOCATION HONORS GRADUATING MEDICAL STUDENTS

  • SENIOR CONVOCATION HONORS GRADUATING MEDICAL STUDENTS

    Thirty-one medical students were honored at the CCHS Senior Convocation on May 13 at the Tuscaloosa River Market. The students, now physicians, are in their residency training in programs across 11 states.

    In an opening address at convocation, Dr. Craig Hoesley, senior associate dean for medical education at the University of Alabama School of Medicine, said the students were leaving CCHS and the School of Medicine “even better than it was when they found it.”

    One of the College’s functions is to serve as a regional campus for the University of Alabama School of Medicine, headquartered in Birmingham. A cohort of third- and fourth-year students receive their clinical education at CCHS.

    Two Tuscaloosa campus students—Russell Guin and Elizabeth Junkin—matched through the National Residency Matching Program into The University of Alabama Family Medicine Residency, which the College operates.

    View all convocation coverage
  • RURAL MEDICAL SCHOLARS CELEBRATE 20TH CLASS

  • RURAL MEDICAL SCHOLARS CELEBRATE 20TH CLASS

    The 20th class of the Rural Medical Scholars Program was honored at a reception on May 1. The program is for rural Alabama students who want to become physicians and practice in rural communities. About 200 students have entered the program since its founding in 1996.

    Helen Cunningham, a scholar of the 20th class, speaks with Dr. Michael McBrearty, the first alumnus of The University of Alabama Family Medicine Residency, at the reception. Cunningham, from Fairhope, Alabama, says McBrearty influenced her decision to pursue medicine. The Residency is operated by CCHS.

    Learn more about the Rural Medical Scholars Program
  • RESIDENTS AND FELLOWS HONORED AT GRADUATION CEREMONY

  • RESIDENTS AND FELLOWS HONORED AT GRADUATION CEREMONY

    Twenty-one physicians were honored at the 41st annual graduation ceremony of The University of Alabama Family Medicine Residency and Fellowships, which was held June 25 at the Zone-South at Bryant-Denny Stadium on the UA campus.

    “We’re very proud of the work this group has done in continuing the mission of the College,” said Dr. Richard Streiffer, dean of CCHS and an alumnus of the Residency, which the College operates.

    View all graduation coverageResidency Website
  • PARTNERSHIP JOINS PICKENS COUNTY WITH UA

  • PARTNERSHIP JOINS PICKENS COUNTY WITH UA

    The University of Alabama-Pickens County Partnership is now underway. Coordinated by CCHS, the partnership seeks to provide sustainable health care for the rural county and real world training for UA students in medicine, nursing, social work, psychology, health education and other disciplines.

    Funds obtained from the Alabama Legislature to initiate the partnership have been used to support the hiring of a coordinator, four year-long paid fellowships for recent UA graduates and nine projects that address Pickens County health issues.

    Wilamena Dailey joined CCHS in May as the coordinator of the partnership, and August Anderson, Laura Beth Brown, Courtney Rentas and Judson Russell began their fellowships in June.

    Nine projects that address health issues are also part of the partnership. Each includes UA faculty, UA students and a Pickens County community organization.

    Here, Laura Beth Brown visits with members of the Reform Senior Center as part of an individual project that is focusing on senior centers and providing the elderly with care, activities and resources.

    Photo: Andrea Mabry

    Learn more about the partnership
  • GROCERY STORE TOURS ADDED TO DIABETES SELF-MANAGEMENT EDUCATION COURSES

  • GROCERY STORE TOURS ADDED TO DIABETES SELF-MANAGEMENT EDUCATION COURSES

    Patients with diabetes at University Medical Center can now take a guided tour of their local grocery store to learn what foods are good for managing their disease and what foods they should avoid.

    Led by Suzanne Henson, registered dietitian and assistant professor of Family Medicine at CCHS, the tours are an addition to the Diabetes Self-Management Education Courses offered at UMC. Kim McMillan, LPN, a nurse in Family Medicine and a primary care patient advocate for UMC, identified the need for the tours after listening to feedback from participants.

    “We give them all this information, and they go to the grocery store and scratch their heads,” she says.

    Now, participants can try new foods, learn how to better read food labels and pick up tips for healthy food swaps in their diet.

    Read the full story, Going Shopping, which appeared in On RoundsView the Fall 2016 issue of On Rounds
  • THE WILLARD REPORT TURNS 50

  • THE WILLARD REPORT TURNS 50

    September marked the 50th anniversary of Meeting the Challenge of Family Practice, a report prepared by the Ad Hoc Committee on Education for Family Practice of the Council on Medical Education, established in 1964 by the American Medical Association.

    Dr. William R. Willard, founding dean of CCHS, chaired the committee, which held 13 two-day meetings in the two years leading to the 1966 release of the report. At the time, experts were calling for the need for physicians to provide continuing comprehensive health care.

    The report gave rise to the specialty of family practice (now family medicine), and highlighted the need for physicians to understand the impact communities have on health and the importance of providing care in communities.

    Read more about The Willard Report
  • CCHS LEADS EFFORTS TO VACCINATE UA AGAINST FLU

  • CCHS LEADS EFFORTS TO VACCINATE UA AGAINST FLU

    More than 7,500 flu shots were given to UA students, faculty and staff during The University of Alabama flu shot campaign, led by CCHS. Vaccinations were provided during the months of September, October and November at locations across campus, including the Quad, University buildings and student residence halls. The shots were free and no insurance was required.

    LEARN MORE ABOUT THE FLU SHOT CAMPAIGN
  • CUBAN PHYSICIANS VISIT CCHS, DISCUSS HEALTH CARE TOPICS

  • CUBAN PHYSICIANS VISIT CCHS, DISCUSS HEALTH CARE TOPICS

    CCHS hosted two physicians from Cuba as part of UA’s Cuba Week. Dr. Nancy de la C. Milián Melero, the municipal director of health for Old Havana, and Dr. José de Jesús Portilla García, professor of general surgery and international medicine, visited UA and the College and discussed health care topics with faculty, staff, medical students and resident physicians.

    Throughout the week, in which the College offered a tour of DCH Regional Medical Center, an Interprofessional Research Breakfast focused on geriatric care, a visit to rural Greensboro, Alabama, and a community reception culminating the week’s activities, Dr. Richard Streiffer, dean of CCHS, emphasized that there were many lessons that Alabama and the US could learn from the Cuban approach to health care.

    “We are a resource-poor state, and they are a resource-poor country. Though we are resource poor, we do have more money. Yet, they have better outcomes. What can we learn from them?” Streiffer said to CCHS faculty, staff, residents and students.

    View full coverage of Cuba Week at CCHS
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