Medical students elected as student officers for Alabama Academy of Family Physicians

Two medical students at the College of Community Health Sciences were elected to yearlong student leadership positions with the Alabama Academy of Family Physicians.

The University of Alabama School of Medicine students, who are receiving their third and fourth years of clinical education at the College, were named to the positions after an election that took place at the Academy’s annual meeting, which was held June 16-19 in Sandestin, Florida.

D. Paul Strickland, a third-year medical student and a Rural Medical Scholar, was elected the communications chair for the student leaders.

Jessica Powell, a fourth-year medical student and also a Rural Medical Scholar, was elected as the communications liaison to Tuscaloosa.

One of the College’s functions is to serve as the Tuscaloosa Regional Campus for the University of Alabama School of Medicine, providing clinical education for a cohort of third- and fourth-year medical students. All students receive their first two years of medical education at the School of Medicine’s main campus in Birmingham.

Four additional medical students from other School of Medicine campuses were also elected to positions.

More than 900 family physicians and more than 430 students and family medicine residents across the state make up the Alabama Academy of Family Physicians. The annual meeting allows members to connect, earn continuing medical education and learn more about representing family medicine in the legislative, regulatory and public arenas.

Medical students honored, presented awards at convocation

Thirty-one medical students were honored at the College of Community Health Sciences’ Senior Convocation on Friday, May 13, at the Tuscaloosa River Market. The students, now physicians, are beginning their residency training in programs across 11 states.

See the full coverage of Senior Convocation, including photos, a list of graduates and awards, here.

The students received their third and fourth years of clinical education at the College, which also functions as the Tuscaloosa Regional Campus for the University of Alabama School of Medicine. All students at the School of Medicine spend their first two years of medical education at the School of Medicine’s headquarter campus in Birmingham and then receive their clinical education at either Birmingham, Tuscaloosa, Huntsville or Montgomery.

In an opening address at convocation, Dr. Craig Hoesley, senior associate dean for medical education at the School of Medicine, said the students are leaving the College and the School of Medicine “even better than it was when they found it.”

The students received awards from faculty, clinical staff and their peers. One of the awards presented was the newly-named William Owings Award in Family Medicine, which was awarded to Dr. Elizabeth Junkin for demonstrating excellence in Family Medicine.

Owings, who recently retired from the College, was recognized at the ceremony by Dr. Drake Lave

nder for his 20 years of service.

“Dr. Owings embodies all that is good in family medicine,” he said. “He was practicing full spectrum family medicine before family medicine even existed.”

On Sunday, May 15, the students joined their 173 classmates for commencement.

At commencement, Dr. John Thomas Killian Jr. received the Hugh J. Dempsey Award, given to the student with the highest overall academic achievement over the four-year course of medical school. Dr. Amber Michelle Beg received the Medical Alumni Association Leadership and Community Service Award.

Awards given at Convocation:

Department and College Awards:
Robert F. Gloor Award in Community Medicine
Drs. Jackson Averett Reynolds and Daniel Seale
Awarded for excellent performance in Community and Rural Medicine

William Owings Award in Family Medicine
Dr. Elizabeth Ann Junkin
Awarded for excellence in Family Medicine

Rural Medical Scholars
Drs. Nicholas Drew Darby, Justin Len Deavers, Andrew Lloyd Jones, Nicholas Allen Rockwell, Daniel Seale, Elijah J. Allen Stiefel

Family/Rural Medicine Preceptor’s Award
Dr. J.D. Shugrue
Awarded annually to a community preceptor in Family Medicine/Community and Rural Medicine who exemplifies excellent teaching and role modeling for students.

William Winternitz Award in Internal Medicine
Dr. Melissa Rae Jordan
Awarded for outstanding achievement in Internal Medicine during the third and fourth years. This student possesses an exceptional wealth of knowledge, is able to integrate the pathology of disease with the physiology of clinical skills, and practices with empathy, compassion, and a desire to improve the patients with whom he or she comes in contact.

Neurology Award
Dr. John Thomas Killian, Jr.
Awarded for outstanding academic and clinical performance during the Neurology Clerkship.

Pediatrics Recognition Award
Dr. Andrew Lloyd Jones
Awarded for outstanding interest, ability and the reflection of pleasure in helping parents and their children reach their full personal, social and educational potential.

Peter Bryce Award in Psychiatry
Dr. John Thomas Killian, Jr.
Awarded for excellence exhibited by a medical student both academically and clinically during his/her Psychiatry Clerkship. This award is presented in honor of Dr. Peter Bryce, who was appointed the first superintendent of Bryce Hospital in Tuscaloosa. He and his wife, Ellen Clarkson Bryce, were cornerstones for Tuscaloosa society and tenacious advocates for people who experience mental illness.

Finney/Akers Memorial Award in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Dr. Brittany Taylor Massengill
Awarded to a student achieving outstanding academic and clinical success in Obstetrics and Gynecology. This award is presented in honor of former medical students James H. Akers and Teresa K. Finney.

William R. Shamblin, MD, Surgery Award
Drs. Daniel Barton Booth, John Thomas Killian, Jr. and Paul Frederick Sauer, Jr.
Awarded to a student or students with the highest scholastic achievement during their third-year Surgery Clerkship. Dr. William R. Shamblin, a Tuscaloosa native and former Chair of the Department of Surgery, spent years educating medical students and Family Medicine residents. This award continues in his honor.

Interprofessional Excellence Award
Dr. Jonathan Russell Guin
This award recognizes the medical student who has best demonstrated excellence in communication skills, respect for staff and patients, and a commitment to working as an effective member of the health care team.

Larry Mayes Research Society Scholars
Drs. Daniel Barton Booth, Pia Marie Abano Cumagun, Katherine Rainey Dean, Wyman Oscar Gilmore III, Jonathan Russell Guin, Andrew Lloyd Jones, Brittany Taylor Massengill, Cyrus Massouleh, Jackson Averett Reynolds, Robert Rhett Rhyne, Nicholas Allen Rockwell, Daniel Seale, Elijah J. Allen Stiefel

Official Fellow Members:
Drs. Nicholas Drew Darby, Justin Len Deavers, Lauren Marie Gibson, Melissa Rae Jordan, Elizabeth Ann Junkin

Official Members: Drs. Emily Cleveland Ager, Cory Daniel Smith

Student Research Award
Dr. Wyman Oscar Gilmore III
Recognition of the pursuit of one or more research projects leading to presentation or publication during the clinical years of medical training.

Scholastic Achievement Award
Dr. John Thomas Killian, Jr.
Awarded for superior performance in the clinical curriculum.

William R. Willard Award
Dr. Elizabeth Ann Junkin
Established by the Bank of Moundville, this award is presented for outstanding contributions to the goals and mission of the College of Community Health Sciences as voted by the College faculty.

Faculty, Resident and Student Awards as determined by the graduating class
Faculty Recognition Award
Dr. Joseph Wallace
Awarded for outstanding contributions to undergraduate medical education during the students’ junior year.

Community Preceptor Recognition Award
Drs. Erica Day-Bevel and Charles Gross
Awarded to a community preceptor for outstanding contributions to undergraduate medical education.

Patrick McCue Award
Dr. A. Robert Sheppard
Awarded for outstanding contributions to undergraduate medical education during the students’ senior year.

Resident Recognition Award
Drs. Blake DeWitt and Brittney Anderson
Awarded for outstanding contributions to medical education.

James H. Akers Memorial Award
Dr. Amber Michelle Beg
Awarded to a graduating senior for dedication to the art and science of medicine.

College Scholarships
Dr. Sandral Hullett Endowed Scholarship
Chaniece Wallace
The Dr. Sandral Hullett Endowed Scholarship was established in 1992 from gifts given by the Capstone Health Services Foundation and proceeds from the 1991 Fiesta Bowl to honor Dr. Hullett, one of the first African-American Family Medicine residents to graduate from The University of Alabama Family Medicine Residency.

Frank Fitts Jr. Endowed Scholarship
Dr. Daniel Seale
The Frank Fitts Jr. Endowed Scholarship was created by Cynthia Ford Fitts (now Thomas) to address the needs of medical students who bear a high debt load upon graduation from medical school. The scholarship was named in honor of her late husband, Frank Fitts Jr., great grandson of J.H. Fitts, who established The University of Alabama’s first endowed scholarship in 1903.

Robert E. Pieroni, MD, and Family Endowed Scholarship
Drs. Elizabeth Ann Junkin and Jonathan Russell Guin
The Robert E. Pieroni, MD, and Family Endowed Scholarship was established by Dr. and Mrs. Robert Pieroni to support medical students intending to enter primary care.

Reese Phifer, Jr., Memorial Foundation Scholarship in CCHS
Drs. Elizabeth Ann Junkin and Jonathan Russell Guin
The Reese Phifer Jr. Memorial Foundation Endowed Scholarship is awarded annually to promote the education of medical students at the College of Community Health Sciences/University of alabama School of Medicine Tuscaloosa Regional Campus. The Foundation was established by Mr. and Mrs. Reese Phifer in 1967 in memory of their son J. Reese Phifer, Jr., a student at The University of Alabama who died in 1964. The foundation established the scholarship fund in 2014. Priority is given to current fourth-year medical students who intend to complete their residency at The University of Alabama Family Medicine Residency, Which the college operates, and who have an interest in spending part of their residency training in Fayette, Alabama.

Larry Mayes Endowed Scholarship
Dr. Amber Michelle Beg
Larry Mayes was an outstanding member of the class of 1986 who died while on an elective rotation in Africa during his senior year. Larry’s family and friends have created a scholarship fund in his memory to promote a broader understanding of international health care and of the health needs of underserved areas of this country. The award is presented to a rising senior to complete an international elective or an elective in an underserved area of this country.

School of Medicine Commencement Ceremony Awards:
Medical Alumni Association Leadership & Community Service Award
Dr. Amber Michelle Beg

Hugh J. Dempsey Memorial Award
Dr. John Thomas Killian, Jr.

Formal Academic Honors
Drs. John Thomas Killian, Jr. and Margaret Pollard Marks – Summa cum laude
Drs. Joshua Thomas Gautney, Matthew Monte May, Paul Frederick Sauer, Jr. – Magna cum laude

Spring scholarships awarded to medical students

Four medical students receiving their clinical education at the College of Community Health Sciences were awarded scholarships.

Danielle Fincher, a third-year medical student, was awarded the Larry Mayes Endowed Scholarship. The award for 2016 was $2,000.

The Larry Mayes Endowed Scholarship is awarded to medical students at the University of Alabama School of Medicine’s Tuscaloosa Regional Campus who elect a community medicine experience in a medically underserved setting in the United States or abroad during their third or fourth year of medical school.

Larry Mayes was a member of the Class of 1986 of the School of Medicine who died while on an elective rotation in Africa during his senior year. His family and friends created the fund in his memory to promote a broader understanding of international health care and of the health needs in underserved areas of the United States.

 

Elizabeth Junkin and Russell Guin, both fourth-year medical students, were awarded the Reese Phifer, Jr., Memorial Foundation Scholarship. The award for each was $1,500.

The Reese Phifer, Jr., Memorial Foundation Scholarship was established in 2014 for medical students receiving their training at the College who intend to join The University of Alabama Family Medicine Residency.

Both Junkin and Guin matched into the College’s Family Medicine Residency.

Maria Gulas, a third-year medical student, was selected as the recipient of the Robert E. Pieroni, MD, and Family Endowed Scholarship. The award for 2016 is $1,000.

The scholarship was established by Dr. Robert Pieroni and Mrs. Dorothy Pieroni in 2007 to support medical students at the College interested in entering primary care. Dr. Pieroni was a faculty member at the College for many years.

CCHS hosts orientation for incoming medical students

The College hosted 32 University of Alabama School of Medicine students April 28 and 29 who will complete their third and fourth years of medical school in Tuscaloosa.

In its role as a regional campus for the School of Medicine, the College provides clinical education for medical students that is oriented toward primary care but that also provides exposure to and experience in other specialties. In its role as a college on The University of Alabama campus, the College operates one of the oldest and largest family medicine residencies in the country and the multi-specialty University Medical Center, and conducts research focused on rural and community health.

During the orientation in Tuscaloosa, medical students learned about the College’s clerkships, participated in CPR training and toured DCH Regional Medical Center.

Medical students complete the first two years of basic sciences courses at the School of Medicine’s main campus in Birmingham, and their third and fourth years at either Birmingham or one of the school’s regional campuses in Tuscaloosa, Huntsville and Montgomery.

University of Alabama School of Medicine, Tuscaloosa Regional Campus
Class of 2018:

Emily Bender
Sarah Bode
Jordan Busing
Grace Cain
Jimmy Cheng
Nic Cobb*+
Kathryn Cox*>
Mary Craig
Laura Crocker
Clinton Erwin
Asaf Gans
Jake Guin*+>
Phillip Higginbotham
Whitney Hudman*
Luke Iannuzzi
Christopher Johnston
Salmaan Kamal
Koushik Kasanagottu+
Madeline Morgan
Randy Nelson*+
Bhavika Patel*
John Pickering
Marshall Pritchett*+
Christopher Ray
Rebecca Shuford+
Paul Strickland*
Mary Katherine Sweeney
Garrett Taylor+
Lissa Tyson+
Ben Walters+
Dana Watson*
Jared Willis*

>Primary Care Scholars
+TLC2 students
*Rural Medical Scholars

Medical student named in inaugural class of Alabama Schweitzer Fellows

A medical student who will receive his clinical education at the College of Community Health Sciences is part of the inaugural class of Alabama Schweitzer Fellows, a group of graduate students across the state selected to spend a year on a community service project to address chronic health problems.

David Osula, a first-year student at the University of Alabama School of Medicine, is developing the Academy of Health Sciences Mentoring Program for inner-city high school students in Birmingham interested in health care careers. Osula will receive his third and fourth years of clinical education at the School of Medicine’s Tuscaloosa Regional Campus, which is located at the College.

The Academy of Health Sciences is run by Birmingham City Schools and hosted at Carver High School. It allows high school students to job shadow and visit hospitals to learn about health care professions, and to take courses and learn skills to prepare them for a career in health care.

Many School of Medicine students were already working with the Academy, Osula says.

“We are involved in several aspects already, including volunteering to teach a few classes, ACT Tutoring, and now, mentoring.”

Osula saw the existing bond between the high school students and medical students as an opportunity to develop a structured mentoring program. After four years of working with Big Brothers Big Sisters, Osula says he has seen the impact mentorships can have on both the mentee and mentor.

With his project, Osula will serve as mentorship coordinator. He will design the program, run a short pilot and implement it in the fall.

The Alabama Schweitzer Chapter was founded in 2015. Many chapters are established across the United States.

The first class of fellows is made up of 16 graduate students from across the state who were selected from applicants in a variety of graduate programs, including medicine, nursing, dentistry, public health, education, social work, law and the arts, according to the chapter’s website. Projects address chronic health issues in the state and their root causes, like poverty, the environment and education.

Osula says his mentoring program will positively impact the students of Carver High school, and they will, in turn, go on to positively impact Alabama health care.

“We, the medical students, are here to supplement their experience and provide new perspective. And soon, we will also be there to provide mentoring, encouragement and advice on how to be successful in their future careers,” he says. “By showing these students our ‘reverence for life’ as Albert Schweitzer so aptly did, we hope they carry on the torch and show a reverence for the lives they encounter in the future.”

TLC2 students join advocates in march to Ala. State House for HIV, AIDS awareness

Medical students at the College of Community Health Sciences marched for HIV and AIDS awareness and met with state leaders as part of the annual Alabama HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, held March 10 at the Alabama State House in Montgomery.

The students, who are part of the Tuscaloosa Longitudinal Community Curriculum (TLC2), participated in the day’s activities as part of their Leadership in Community and Population Medicine elective, says Dr. Lea Yerby, assistant professor of Community and Rural Medicine and the Institute for Rural Health Research at the College.

About 250 people living with HIV or AIDS and receiving medication from the AIDS Drug Assistance Program were present, along with other advocates for HIV and AIDS awareness from across the state.

“The purpose of the students’ participation was to learn about more organized advocacy, practice advocacy on the state level with the legislators representing their clinics’ communities, learn about advocating for their patients, and to see patients advocating for themselves,” Yerby says.

One of the most memorable parts of the day for TLC2 student Maria Gulas was hearing the stories of those living with HIV and AIDS.

“It was inspiring to see how these individuals overcame such devastating health effects and social stigma to be thriving as they are today,” Gulas says.

The students marched with the group to the Alabama State House and distributed district-specific HIV prevalence data to senators and representatives. Gulas said many of those living with HIV and AIDS advocated for themselves directly to state leaders.

“It was so powerful to see them fighting for their own care, with the support of family, friends, community members, public health leaders, and future providers, as the decisions made in that building will affect the lives of people living with HIV across Alabama,” Gulas says.

She says the experience was valuable for her and the other TLC2 students because it allowed them to connect with and learn from people living with HIV and AIDS as well as advocate for them and for those who will be future patients.

“Advocacy is a critical component of patient care, but it is not something to which we have much exposure in medical school,” Gulas says. “Just with this one day, I think all the medical students left with a clearer picture of what it means to advocate for your patients and gained confidence in our abilities to do just that.”

 

Medical students match into residencies

Fourth-year medical students from the University of Alabama School of Medicine Tuscaloosa Regional Campus learned March 18 through the National Resident Matching Program where they will train for the next three to seven years for their graduate medical education.

The 30 students were among the thousands across the country who entered into the Main Residency Match and received residency placements.

These fourth-year medical students have received their clinical education at the College of Community Health Sciences, which also functions as a regional campus for the School of Medicine, headquartered in Birmingham.

Two Tuscaloosa campus students—Russell Guin and Elizabeth Junkin—matched into the College’s Family Medicine Residency.

Five other students placed in family medicine. Altogether, students were placed at residencies across 10 states.

Watch the video of the University of Alabama School of Medicine’s Match Day celebration here:

Tuscaloosa Regional Campus Students and Where They Matched:

Emily Ager
Family Medicine — University of Tennessee College of Medicine (Chattanooga, Tennessee)

Amber Beg
Pediatrics – Primary Care — University of North Carolina Hospitals (Chapel Hill, North Carolina)

Daniel Booth
Transitional — Baptist Health System (Birmingham, Alabama)
Radiology – Diagnostic — UAB Medical Center (Birmingham, Alabama)

Pia Cumagun
Internal Medicine — Baptist Health System (Birmingham, Alabama)

Nicholas Darby*
Family Medicine — Cahaba Medical Care (Centreville, Alabama)

Justin Deavers*
Family Medicine — Dwight D. Eisenhower Army Medical Center (Fort Gordon, Georgia)

Russell Fung
Internal Medicine — University of Tennessee College of Medicine (Chattanooga, Tennessee)

Joshua Gautney
Internal Medicine — University of Texas Southwestern Medical School (Dallas, Texas)

Lauren Gibson
Pediatrics — Palmetto Health Richland (Columbia, South Carolina)

Wyman Gilmore, III*
Family Medicine — John Peter Smith Hospital (Fort Worth, Texas)

Russell Guin
Family Medicine — The University of Alabama Family Medicine Residency (Tuscaloosa, Alabama)

Andrew Jones*
Pediatrics — University of Louisville School of Medicine (Louisville, Kentucky)

Melissa Jordan
Internal Medicine — University of Kentucky Medical Center (Lexington, Kentucky)

Elizabeth Junkin
Family Medicine — The University of Alabama Family Medicine Residency (Tuscaloosa, Alabama)

John Killian, Jr.
General Surgery — UAB Medical Center (Birmingham, Alabama)

Missy Ma
General Surgery — UAB Medical Center (Birmingham, Alabama)

Margaret Marks
Pediatrics — UAB Medical Center (Birmingham, Alabama)

Brittany Massengill
Obstetrics and Gynecology — University Hospitals (Jackson, Mississippi)

Cyrus Massouleh
Emergency Medicine — Virginia Commonwealth University Health System (Richmond, Virginia)

Eleanor Mathews*
General Surgery — Baptist Health System (Birmingham, Alabama)

Matthew May
Otolaryngology — Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education (Rochester, Minnesota)

Katherine Rainey
General Surgery — Greenville Health System University of South Carolina (Greenville, South Carolina)

Jackson Reynolds
Internal Medicine — University of Tennessee College of Medicine (Memphis, Tennessee)

Robert Rhyne
General Surgery — Greenville Health System University of South Carolina (Greenville, South Carolina)

Nicholas Rockwell*
Pediatrics — UAB Medical Center (Birmingham, Alabama)

Paul Sauer, Jr.
Plastic Surgery (Integrated) — University of Kentucky Medical Center (Lexington, Kentucky)

Daniel Seale*
Family Medicine — Forrest General Hospital (Hattiesburg, Mississippi)

Cory Smith
Orthopaedic Surgery — Greenville Health System University of South Carolina (Greenville, South Carolina)

Elijah Stiefel*
Pathology — Louisiana State University School of Medicine (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Loy Vaughan, III
Orthopaedic Surgery — Ochsner Clinic Foundation (New Orleans, Louisiana)

*Rural Medical Scholar
(The College’s Rural Medical Scholars Program is a five-year track of medical studies that focuses on rural primary care and community medicine and leads to a medical degree. The program is exclusively for Alabama students from rural communities.)

Three medical students selected to honor society

Three University of Alabama School of Medicine students who are receiving their clinical education at the College of Community Health Sciences were selected to the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society as juniors.

The students, all in their third year of medical school, are Steven Allon, Caroline Rose Kennemer and William Benton Lee.

Alpha Omega Alpha is a professional medical organization that recognizes excellence in scholarship as well as an outstanding commitment and dedication to caring for others. The top 25 percent of a medical school class is eligible for nomination to the honor society, and up to 16 percent may be selected.

About 3,000 students, alumni and faculty are elected to Alpha Omega Alpha each year. The society has 120 chapters in medical schools throughout the United States and has elected more than 150,000 members since its founding in 1902.

In its role as a regional campus of the University of Alabama School of Medicine, the College provides clinical education to a subset of third- and fourth-year medical students. The students complete the first two years of basic science courses at the School of Medicine’s main campus in Birmingham, and then complete clinical rotations on the Tuscaloosa Regional Campus in the departments of Family Medicine, Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Neurology, Psychiatry and Surgery.

New faculty join CCHS

New faculty and providers have joined the College of Community Health Sciences in different departments.

Dr. Ed Geno is assistant professor in the College’s Department of Family Medicine. He will also work with Family Medicine Residents in minor surgery, hospital medicine and at University Medical Center, which the College operates.

 Geno attended medical school at the University of Oklahoma School of Medicine. He then completed three years of general surgery residency at Ochsner Foundation Hospital in New Orleans, Louisiana, where he then completed a residency in family medicine. He taught in the Ochsner’s Family Medicine Residency before moving to Baton Rouge.

He has practiced obstetrics throughout his time in graduate medical education, in addition to minor procedures and clinic and hospital medicine. He also serves as an advisory faculty for the Advanced Life Support in Obstetrics, or ALSO, on a national level.

Dr. Catherine Ikard is assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine and Internal Medicine as well as the Neurology Clerkship Director.

Ikard is a board-certified neurologist who received her medical degree from the University of South Alabama College of Medicine in Mobile, Alabama. She then completed her residency in neurology at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in Little Rock, Arkansas.

Ikard says she enjoys the practice of general neurology and sees patients with a variety of neurological disorders, including stroke, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, dementia, movement and neuromuscular disorders and headache syndromes. She has a procedures interest in occipital nerve blocks, trigger point injections and the administration of botulinum toxin for migraine and neuromuscular disorders.

Medical students and residents take new UA Culinary Medicine course

Medical students and residents at the College who are taking UA’s new Culinary Medicine elective had their first class on January 26. The course is a partnership of the Colleges of Community Health Sciences and Human Environmental Sciences.

“This is the kickoff of the first Culinary Medicine elective,” Dr. Richard Streiffer, dean of CCHS, said to begin the class.

Through lectures, hands-on cooking classes and follow-up discussion, the class will teach CCHS medical students and family medicine residents, as well as CHES nutrition students, how to better educate patients about their diets. Students will learn the basics of cooking so that they can provide patients with helpful information when addressing chronic disease management and obesity. Classes are held in the CHES teaching kitchen.

Twenty-four students are taking the course – 10 medical students, eight nutrition students and six residents. It is taught by Dr. Jennifer Clem, assistant professor in family medicine for CCHS, and Dr. Linda Knol, associate professor of human nutrition for CHES.

The course pulls from modules of the curriculum of the Goldring Center for Culinary Medicine at Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans and includes principles of diabetes, weight and portion control, hypertension, sodium, carbohydrates and the Mediterranean diet.

“I have patients who are overweight, who have diabetes, and that’s why I’m here,” Clem told the students.

During the first class, students divided into three teams of eight and participated in a cooking exercise. Teams prepared a dinners of whole-wheat spaghetti, some with meat sauce and some with lentils and vegetables, as well as salads with lettuce, kale, carrots and other vegetables. After the cooking exercise, they discussed the nutritional content of the dishes, learning, for example, that using whole-wheat pasta increases the amount of fiber in one’s diet.

Streiffer touted the benefits of the interprofessional aspect of the course.

“Doctors don’t learn enough about nutrition in medical school, and a great majority of chronic disease is nutrition related. Other disciplines have greater practice with this. We can learn from each other.”