Geriatric Fellowship now open for applicants

The College of Community Health Science is now offering a geriatrics fellowship for family medicine physicians seeking additional training in caring for the aging population.

Applications are being accepted for the program, which is accredited for up to two fellows. The fellowship will start July 2016.

Fellows will be trained to collaborate interprofessionally, and they will have the opportunity to practice in nursing homes, assisted living homes, hospice and in behavioral health, says Dr. Anne Halli-Tierney, who will lead the fellowship. Halli-Tierney is assistant professor in Family Medicine and director of the geriatric clinic at University Medical Center, which is operated by the College.

The fellowship will also include training in a rural setting. Fellows will practice with Dr. Julia Boothe in Reform, Alabama, at Pickens County Primary Care.

“The rural education will be a combination of outpatient clinic work, inpatient geriatric psychiatry and nursing home care,” says Halli-Tierney.

Dr. Richard Friend, director of the College’s Family Medicine Residency, says the hope is for graduates of the fellowship to stay in the area and serve the needs of Alabama.

“We have very few geriatricians in our community, and we have an ever aging population,” says Friend. “These physicians will be specially trained to understand the complex problems of the geriatric population, and as the population in Alabama ages, they’ll be in the unique position to assist with those needs.”

Halli-Tierney says that about 300 geriatricians graduate from fellowship programs each year—not nearly enough to sustain the number of retiring practitioners who have training to care for the older population.

“And with baby boomer population surging toward old age, primary care practitioners definitely need training in how to deal with the problems of older adults,” she says.

The U.S. Census Bureau recently projected that the number of people 65 and older in the United States is expected to increase from 44.7 million in 2013 to 98.3 million in 2060.

The Center for Business and Economic Research (CBER) at The University of Alabama Culverhouse College of Commerce projected a trend in Alabama comparable to that of the United States. The CBER researchers projected that the number of Alabama residents 65 and older will increase from 721,166 in 2013 to 1.2 million in 2040.

Rural populations in particular have a higher percentage of of older residents than the United States in general, says Dr. Richard Streiffer, dean of the College. He and Dr. Thomas Weida, chief medical officer and dean of clinical affairs for the College, will serve as key clinical faculty for the fellowship.

The College offers fellowships in obstetrics, sports medicine, hospital medicine, behavioral health and rural public psychiatry. Many of these programs offer concentration on caring for rural areas.

Halli-Tierney says the addition of the geriatrics fellowship to the College furthers its mission.

“We are interested in preparing physicians who will go out into communities and practice and impact patients’ lives through direct care,” she says. “When the fellows graduate, they will be able to function effectively in multiples arenas, whether it be long-term care, end-of-life care, or quality primary care for elders in their communities. Patients in some rural areas may not be able to travel to see a specialist, so if their primary care provider has geriatrics training, this will help the elder receive aging appropriate care close to home.”

Family Medicine Residency Celebrates 40th Anniversary with Reunion Weekend

The College of Community Health Sciences is hosting a reunion weekend Nov. 13-15, 2015, to celebrate 40 years of its Family Medicine Residency.

The weekend will allow Residency alumni to reconnect with their classmates, the College and the University through social events and a lecture series for continuing medical education.

The Residency, one of the oldest and largest family medicine residencies in the United States, was founded in 1974 and to date has graduated 450 family medicine physicians. More than half of those graduates are practicing in 46 of Alabama’s 67 counties, and 48 percent are practicing in a rural area of the state.

One in seven family physicians practicing in Alabama graduated from the Family Medicine Residency. And 77 percent of the Residency’s alumni practice in a primary care physician shortage area.

The College’s mission is to improve and promote the health of individuals and communities in Alabama and the region, and part of how it accomplishes that mission is by addressing the physician workforce needs of Alabama and the region with a focus on comprehensive Family Medicine Residency training.

The anniversary celebration weekend will kick off with a cocktail party on Friday evening, Nov. 13, at the Tuscaloosa Museum of Art and will include guided tours of the museum’s Westervelt Collection.

A lecture series will be held at the College the morning of Saturday, Nov. 14. Continuing medical education credits will be offered, and the lectures will cover a variety of topics related to the specialty of family medicine. The series will also include a two-part presentation by John B. Sullivan, MD, MBA, a 1978 Residency alumnus well known for his work in toxicology, including the development of rattlesnake bite anti-venom serum, as well as development of medication safety caps following seven Tylenol-related deaths in Chicago in 1982 that were the result of product tampering.

A gala will be held Saturday evening at the North Zone of Bryant-Denny Stadium. The event will feature a formal dinner with guest speaker Glen Stream, MD, FACCFP, President of Family Medicine for America’s Health and former president of the American Academy of Family Physicians, followed by live music and dancing.

On Sunday, Nov. 15, a farewell brunch will be held at Sweet Home Food Bar in downtown Tuscaloosa.

Tickets for the weekend are $35 per person. More information about the weekend’s agenda, where to find accommodations and how to RSVP can be found at cchs.ua.edu/fmr40.

 

 

College to host 40th Anniversary Reunion Weekend for Family Medicine Residency

The College of Community Health Sciences is hosting a reunion weekend Nov. 13-15, 2015, to celebrate 40 years of its Family Medicine Residency.

The weekend will include social events, such as a cocktail party on Nov. 13 and a gala on Nov. 14, as well CME opportunities, to allow Residency alumni to reconnect with their classmates and the College.

The weekend will start with a casual social event on Friday, Nov. 13, at the Tuscaloosa Museum of Art. Hor d’oeuvres and cocktails will be served, and guided tours of the museum’s Westervelt Collection will be provided.

The morning of Saturday, Nov. 14, a CME lecture series will be offered at the College and will cover a variety of topics. The series will include a two-part presentation by John B. Sullivan, MD, MBA, a 1978 Residency alumnus well known for his work in toxicology, including the development of rattlesnake bite anti-venom serum.

A gala will then be held Saturday evening at the North Zone of Bryant-Denny Stadium. The event will include dinner and dancing and will feature guest speaker Glen Stream, MD, FACCFP, President of Family Medicine for America’s Health and former AAFP President.

A farewell brunch will be held on Sunday, Nov. 15, at Sweet Home Food Bar in Downtown Tuscaloosa.

Tickets for the weekend are $35 per person. More information about the weekend’s agenda, where to find accommodations and how to RSVP can be found at cchs.ua.edu/fmr40.

The Residency was founded in 1974 and has graduated 450 family medicine physicians. More than half of those graduates are practicing in 46 of Alabama’s 67 counties, and 48 percent are practicing in a rural area of the state.

One in seven family physicians in Alabama graduated from the College’s Family Medicine Residency. Seventy-seven percent of the Residency’s alumni practice in a primary care physician shortage area.

The College’s mission is to improve and promote the health of individuals and communities in Alabama and the region, and part of how it accomplishes that mission is by addressing the physician workforce needs of Alabama and the region with a focus on comprehensive Family Medicine Residency training.

Faculty, resident learn about culinary medicine curriculum

Faculty and a family medicine resident at the College of Community Health Sciences spent two days in New Orleans brushing up on their cooking skills and learning more about the medical student curriculum at Tulane University’s Goldring Center for Culinary Medicine.

The Goldring Center hosted the two-day retreat welcoming universities and health care centers that license its curriculum to teach medical students how to better counsel their patients about food and nutrition. The center is led by executive director Dr. Timothy Harlan and program director Chef Leah Sarris, who is the first full-time chef to be employed by a medical school.

Sarris was a keynote speaker at the 16th Annual Rural Health Conference, hosted by the College and its Institute for Rural Health Research. She provided a demonstration at the conference of how to prepare healthy meals for an entire week using $150, the maximum food assistant allotment for a family of four from the Alabama Food Assistance Program.

Those who attended the retreat from the College were Dr. Richard Streiffer, dean of the College; Dr. John C. Higginbotham, Associate Dean for Research, Chair of the Department of Community and Rural Medicine and director of the Institute for Rural Health Research ; Dr. Jennifer Clem, assistant professor of Family Medicine; and Dr. Bhavika Patel, a chief resident in the College’s Family Medicine Residency.

Patel says she didn’t know much about culinary medicine beforehand, but her interest in food deserts and obesity sparked her interest.

“Physicians can be very influential to patients making beneficial lifestyle changes,” she says. “But it can be difficult for the patients to return to their home lives after the doctor visit and enact the changes they talked about. Merely talking to patients may not be enough, and sometimes it’s easier to understand what to do at home if the instructions are more hands-on.”

Patel hopes to apply this approach to patient education in her practice after graduating. “I want to take at a minimum their community module wherever I go to tackle obesity from the front lines.” She says she’ll likely practice in rural Georgia.

Streiffer says he hopes the Tulane curriculum will be incorporated into the College’s medical student education, Family Medicine Residency and even at the community level educating the public. He says he hopes that using the curriculum will lead to interprofessional collaborations.

“Addressing lifestyle issues in order to improve health is fundamental to what we do in primary care in the nation,” said Streiffer in a NOLA.com article. “We need ultimately to equip our students with a better set of skills, not just with disease but about wellness. This is a piece of a longer-term strategy to change our curriculum and our product.”

Faculty to take on new roles in Family Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynecology

Faculty in the departments of Family Medicine and Obstetrics and Gynecology at the College of Community Health Sciences will be taking on new roles.

Dr. Richard Friend is now Chair of Family Medicine. Friend, who is also the director of the The University of Alabama Family Medicine Residency, had been serving as Interim Chair of the department.

“He has done an excellent job in both of these demanding roles, and I am pleased that he will take on the permanent position of Chair,” says Dr. Richard Streiffer, dean of the College.

As part of his transition into this role, Friend created several new roles in Family Medicine. Dr. Catherine Scarbrough is now Clinic Director for the Family Medicine Residency, and she will continue to serve in her role as Associate Residency Director. Scarbrough and Dr. Jared Ellis have both served as Associate Residency Directors, and now they will be joined by Dr. Jane Weida in that position in August. Weida will also have an academic appointment in Family Medicine. Dr. Tamer Elsayed has been named Assistant Residency Director.

Dr. Thomas Weida has joined the College as Associate Dean of Clinical Affairs and Chief Medical Officer, assuming a major leadership and administrative role, particularly in the College’s clinical enterprise. He will also have an academic appointment in Family Medicine.

Dr. Jimmy Robinson, director of the College’s Sports Medicine Fellowship, will join the College as full-time faculty in on July 1. His practice at University Medical Center, which is operated by the College, will continue to operate in the Sports Medicine Clinic.

Dr. Ray Brignac, a graduate of the College’s Family Medicine Residency who has practiced for a number of years in Selma, Ala., has joined the College as a part-time clinician. Brignac will practice at University Medical Center-Northport, set to open July 1, with a focus on geriatrics.

In the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Dr. Daniel Avery, who has served as chair of the department for several years, will work with Medical Student Education in admissions in the development of the College’s Tuscaloosa Longitudinal Community Curriculum, and he will take on a research role with the Department of Community and Rural Medicine and the Institute for Rural Health Research. He will continue to serve as Medical Director of UMC’s Lab and X-ray division.

“We thank Dan Avery for his years of service in OB/GYN, and we share the excitement he has about these new responsibilities and his continued contribution to CCHS,” Streiffer says.

Stepping into the role of Chair of Obstetrics and Gynecology starting July 1 is Dr. Kristy Graettinger. She has served as assistant professor in Obstetrics and Gynecology, and, in December 2014, she graduated from Leadership U, a University of Alabama program designed to prepare UA faculty and professional staff leaders to face challenges and opportunities in higher education.

Dr. Dwight Hooper is leaving the College to join the faculty at Florida State University. Graettinger will take over his role as Clinic Director for Obstetrics and Gynecology. And Dr. Catherine Skinner, assistant professor in Family Medicine, will assume the responsibilities of director of the College’s Obstetrics Fellowship.

Dr. Cecily Collins will join Obstetrics and Gynecology in August. Collins was a medical student at the College, which serves as a regional campus for the University of Alabama School of Medicine. She is completing her residency in Florida.

Dr. Elizabeth Cockrum retired from the College after 25 years of service.

“Dr. Cockrum had a tremendous impact on students, residents, staff, faculty and patients in her roles as teacher, clinician and associate dean,” Streiffer says. “We wish her well.”

Streiffer says that the transitions and new roles taken on is exciting for the College.

“All of this is very exciting and gratifying, especially as the College continues our implementation of our strategic plan, guided by our core values of interprofessional collaboration, learning and innovation. We can all look forward to additional team-oriented, collaborative efforts in the coming weeks. To those assuming new roles, and to those transitioning to other new and exciting opportunities, congratulations and thank you.”

 

Family Medicine Residents recognized at graduation ceremony

Fourteen physicians graduated June 21 from The University of Alabama Family Medicine Residency and will soon begin their own practices in Alabama and other states, and several will go on to complete fellowship programs.

The residency is operated by the College of Community Health Sciences and provides physicians with three years of specialty training in family medicine.

Fellows were also recognized at the graduation ceremony, which was held at the South Zone in Bryant-Denny Stadium. In addition to the residency, the College also offers year-long fellowships in behavioral health, hospitalist medicine, obstetrics, rural public psychiatry and sports medicine. The fellowships provide additional training for family medicine physicians in other specialty areas.

Residency Director Dr. Richard Friend welcomed graduates and their families and guests. “It’s been an honor to imprint good skills and habits on these physicians in training,” he said. “I’m so proud to have been a part of their education.”

The graduation keynote speaker was Dr. Julia Booth, an adjunct faculty member at the College and a 2005 residency graduate.

“When I was asked to speak, I thought, ‘What can I share with these stellar people?’ In the last three years, I’ve learned as much from these graduates as I’ve taught them.” She continued: “You have worked hard to complete a rigorous curriculum at a prestigious residency program. You will be challenged early and often, so be ready. Be willing to serve and teach, and be willing to stretch yourself. Surround yourself with great role models. Stay the course, fight the good fight and support each other. The friendships you have made here will last a lifetime.”

One in seven family medicine physicians practicing in Alabama are graduates of The University of Alabama Family Medicine Residency. To date, the residency, which had its first graduate in 1975, has graduated 449 residents who are practicing in 30 states. Of those, 240 are practicing in Alabama in 48 of the state’s 67 counties.

 

2015 Residency Graduates – Where they will practice

Dr. John Adams – PriCare Family Medicine in Alexander City, Ala.
Dr. Amita Chhabra – Mohan & Mohan Medical in Bridgeport, Ala.
Dr. James Hwang – Hospitalist, Tuscaloosa, Ala.
Dr. Rakhshanda Khan – Bailey Cove Family Practice in Huntsville, Ala.
Dr. Raven Ladner – Memorial Hospital in Gulfport, Miss.
Dr. Sarah Mauthe (chief resident) – Mobile Infirmary in Mobile, Ala.
Dr. Holly McCaleb – Group practice in Haleville, Ala.
Dr. Ginger Medders – University of South Alabama Sports Medicine Fellowship in Mobile, Ala.
Dr. Sneha Patel – Moving to Alexandria, Va.
Dr. Ilinca Prisacaru – Pell City Family & Internal Medicine in Pell City, Ala.
Dr. Razel Remen – Institute for Family Health Academic Fellowship in Women’s Health in New York City
Dr. Phillip Robbins – Carrollton Primary Care in Carrollton, Ala.
Dr. Carl Russell (chief resident) – College of Community Health Sciences Sports Medicine Fellowship
Dr. Kelly Shoemake (chief resident) – Ellisville Medical Clinic in Ellisville, Miss.

 

Resident Award Winners

William R. Willard Award – Dr. Justin Vines (first-year resident)
Internal Medicine/Intern Award – Dr. Keirsten Smith and Dr. Justin Vines
Internal Medicine/Best Resident – Dr. Sarah Mauthe
Pediatrics Award – Dr. Razel Remen
Psychiatry Award – Dr. James Hwang
Psychiatry/R3 Award – Dr. Razel Remen
Obstetrics and Gynecology Award – Dr. Kelly Shoemake
Research/Scholarship Award – Dr. Raven Ladner and Dr. Holly McCaleb
Society of Teachers in Family Medicine Teaching Award – Dr. James Hwang
William F. deShazo III Award – Dr. Raven Ladner
360 Award – Dr. James Hwang

 

Fellowship Graduates Recognized

Sports Medicine Fellows – Dr. Jeremy Coleman and Dr. Donald Perry
Hospitalist Medicine Fellows – Dr. David Aymond and Dr. Mukta Kapdi
Obstetrics Fellow – Dr. Laura Linken

 

Rural Medical Scholar Graduates Recognized

Dr. John Adams
Dr. Holly McCaleb
Dr. Phillip Robbins
Dr. Carl Russell

The College’s Rural Medical Scholars Program is designed to recruit students from rural Alabama who want to become physicians and practice in rural communities in the state.

 

 

Family Medicine Residency announces class of 2018

Sixteen new residents were welcomed into the College of Community Health Sciences’s Family Medicine Residency class of 2018 on March 20 through the National Resident Matching Program.

One of the residents to join the class is Jackie Parks, a fourth-year medical student at the College, which also functions as the Tuscaloosa Regional Campus for the University of Alabama School of Medicine, headquartered in Birmingham.

More than 1,700 candidates applied for the available slots, and 120 were interviewed. The residency, a three-year program and one of the largest of its kind in the country, was able to fill all the positions through the match process.

The College’s mission is to improve and promote the health of individuals and communities in Alabama and the region, and one of the ways it fulfills that mission is by addressing the physician workforce in Alabama and the region with a focus on comprehensive family medicine residency training.

To address the growing need for primary care physicians in Alabama and nationwide, the Family Medicine Residency has been undergoing an expansion in recent years. It recently applied for and received additional residency slots, which brought its total approved and funded slots from 36 to 45.

One in seven family physicians practicing in Alabama has graduated from the Family Medicine Residency, and the 230 graduates practicing in Alabama are in 46 of the state’s 67 counties. Of the 436 graduates practicing outside of Alabama, the majority practice in the South or the southeast.

 

The University of Alabama Family Medicine Residency Class of 2018:

Dakota Acton
University of Alabama School of Medicine at Birmingham

Andrea Boettcher
St. George’s University

Ansley Hairrell
University of Alabama School of Medicine at Birmingham

Bryce Hunt
University of Alabama School of Medicine at Birmingham

Stephen Kelton
Medical University of the Americas

Brianna Kendrick
University of Pikeville

Natalie Kuijpers
St. George’s University

Paul Manhas
Saba University

Brittany McArthur
Saba University

Randi Melton
Edward Via College

Jackie Parks
University of Alabama School of Medicine, Tuscaloosa Regional Campus

Swati Patel
Medical University of the Americas

Efe Sahinoglu
University of Alabama School of Medicine at Birmingham

Lisa Tsugios
Medical University of the Americas

Ashley Wambolt
Saba University

Amy Wambolt
Saba University

Chief residents announced

Three chief residents of The University of Alabama Family Medicine Residency were named this month: Drs. Katie Gates, Tim Eckford and Bhavika Patel. All three physicians are in their second year of residency.

The University of Alabama Family Medicine Residency is a three-year post-graduate medical education program of the College of Community Health Sciences that leads to board certification in Family Medicine.

“Drs. Gates, Eckford and Patel are very dedicated and professional individuals,” said Dr. Ricky Friend, residency director. “I am confident that they will be excellent chief residents. They are very deserving of this honor.”

Gates is a graduate of the University of Alabama School of Medicine in Birmingham. She completed her clinical training at the College before entering the residency program. Gates plans to work in an outpatient clinic upon graduating from residency and is also considering the College’s sports medicine fellowship.

A graduate of Saba University in the Caribbean, Eckford hopes to practice medicine all over the world upon graduating from the residency.

Patel graduated from Kasturba Medical College at Manipal University in India. After residency, she plans to get her Master’s of Public Health degree and practice rural and community medicine.

The three chief residents replace Drs. Sarah Mauthe, Kelly Shoemake and Hunter Russell.

130914_JH_CCHS

Dr. Katie Gates

131027_JH_05_Tim_Eckford

Dr. Tim Eckford

130914_JH_CCHS

Dr. Bhavika Patel

 

Family Medicine Residency Continues Expansion

When Friend started full time in May 2013 (he first worked part time starting in December 2012), one of his priorities as director was expanding the residency from 36 to 44 slots. Currently, the College is approved for 48 slots as it seeks additional funding for the residency.

The goal to expand the residency is the College’s response to Alabama’s and the country’s growing need for primary care physicians. The national demand, which is projected to grow more rapidly than physician supply, is expected to reach a potential shortage of 20,400 physicians by 2020*, according to a November 2013 analysis from the Health Resources and Services Administration.

The state ofAlabama also has a serious primary care physician shortage, ranking nine out of 50 in terms of the most underserved states based on Health Professional Shortage Area (HPSA) scores.

“I think we need to continue to respond to the needs of the community and the state,” Friend says. “We need to look at potential expansion in the future as a means to meet the growing demand for well-trained family physicians.”

Expanding the residency has long been an interest of the College, and though it has run across some hurdles, it has seen growth before. No legal barriers exist to prevent a residency from growing, but funding and accreditation can stand in the way. In 1997, the total number of resident slots were frozen nationwide and within each hospital by law, making it practically impossible for affordable graduate medical education expansion. 

So when the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services created a one-time reallocation ofunused slots in 2009 to allow some programs to expand, the College jumped at the chance and applied for more positions through the Affordable Care Act signed in 2010. 

The residency leadership at the time applied for and received approval from the Residency Review Committee to potentially expand to a 48-slot program. The residency then learned it was awarded eight additional residency slots, bringing the total approved and funded residency slots from 36 to 44. 

Since that growth, more faculty have been added as more residents have joined the program. In the last three years, the residency has seen seven newcomers: Jared Ellis, MD, associate residency director and assistant professor in Family Medicine; Catherine Scarbrough, MD, assistant residency director and assistant professor in Family Medicine; Harriet Meyers, PhD, an associate professor with joint appointments in Family Medicine and Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine; as well as Jennifer Clem, MD, an assistant professor, H. Joseph Fritz, MD, an assistant professor, Drake Lavender, an  assistant professor and Anne Halli-Tierney, MD, a geriatrician and assistant professor, all in Family Medicine.

Friend says there has also been a significant increase in interest in the program from medical students. The residency received about 2,000 applications for 15 slots in 2013—a 30 percent increase from 2012.

Part of that may be due to the fervent recruitment and promotion of the program. Chief residents Mark Christensen, MD, JD Engelbrecht, MD, and Jonathan Parker, DO, have led the efforts to improve the marketing strategy and digital presence of the residency.

Or it may be that more are recognizing the importance of family doctors, Friend says. According to the Merritt Hawkins 2013 Review of Physician and Advanced Practitioner Recruiting Incentives, health care employers recruited more family physicians than any other specialty in 2012 and 2013.

“We all know there are not enough family physicians to meet current demand,” Friend says. “We’re seeing salaries for family physicians rise while salaries for specialists are declining. We’re seeing more qualified medical students who previously chose specialty care going into primary care.”

And for those medical students, Friend says there has been talk of creating a rural track for the program. Residents would complete their first year in Tuscaloosa and the second and third years in rural communities as a way to increase the number of providers for those communities.

“That’s our job,” Friend says. “I think we have the infrastructure to provide outstanding physicians to these communities, and I think part of our mission is to enhance our training and provide physicians for these communities—well-trained family physicians.”

*Under a scenario in which the rapidly growing nurse practitioner and physician assistant supply can effectively be integrated, the shortage of 20,400 physicians in 2020 could be reduced to 6,400 primary care
practitioners, according to the HRSA analysis.

 

College’s Family Medicine Residency fills 2017 class

Fifteen new residents were welcomed into the College of Community Health Sciences’s Family Medicine Residency class of 2017 on March 21 through the National Residency Match Program. One new resident was welcomed into the class of 2016.

More than 1,900 candidates applied for the available slots in 2013—a 30 percent increase from 2012—and 110 were interviewed. The residency, which is a three-year program and one of the largest of its kind in the country, was able to fill all the positions through the match process.

Two of the residents to join the class of 2017 are fourth-year medical students at the College (which also functions as the Tuscaloosa Regional Campus for the University of Alabama School of Medicine, headquartered in Birmingham): Brittney Anderson and Justin Vines.

“We are very excited to announce our intern class,” says residency director Richard Friend, MD. “This is a talented group of physicians that will work hard and do well.”

The residency has been undergoing an expansion in recent years. To address the growing demand for primary care physicians in Alabama and nationwide, the Family Medicine Residency recently applied for and received eight additional residency slots, bringing its total approved and funded slots from 36 to 44.

One in eight family physicians practicing in Alabama has graduated from the Family Medicine Residency, and the 224 graduates practicing in Alabama are in 48 of the state’s 67 counties. Of the 423 graduates practicing outside of Alabama, the majority practice in the South or southeast.

The Family Medicine Residency Class of 2017:

Shawanda Agnew
University of Mississippi

Brittney Anderson
University of Alabama School of Medicine, Tuscaloosa Regional Campus

Joe Brewer
Lincoln Memorial University

Carrie Coxwell
University of Alabama School of Medicine at Birmingham

Keirsten Davio
American University of the Caribbean

Blake DeWitt
Texas Tech University

Eric Frempong
American University of the Caribbean

Keri Merschman
University of Alabama School of Medicine, Huntsville

Remona Peterson
Texila American University, Guyana

Michelle Pike
American University of the Caribbean

Aisha Pitts
Southern Illinois University

Brooke Robinson
Meharry Medical College

Stephen Smith
American University of the Caribbean

Justin Vines
University of Alabama School of Medicine, Tuscaloosa Regional Campus

Courtney Weaver
University of Mississippi

Maysoon Hamed
University of Cairo (Class of 2016/PGY-2)