U.S. News: 10 Gross Things You Should Stop Doing in College

Take a look at this U.S. News slideshow with several quotes from Dr. Thomas Weida, Associate Dean of Clinical Affairs at CCHS.

Through the Tuscaloosa Pre-K Partnership, UA students deliver academic and medical services to preschoolers and their families

The initiative offers broad health services through partnerships with UA’s School of Medicine, Family Medicine Residency, Speech and Hearing Center and Capstone College of Nursing.

WBRC: New UA partnership aimed at sustaining and improving health care in rural west AL

A new partnership between The University of Alabama and Pickens County is aimed at sustaining and increasing health care services in a rural area, where it can often be a struggle to keep these services available.

The initial concept for The University of Alabama-Pickens County Partnership began growing several years ago when Pickens County Medical Center in Carrollton was facing serious hardships.

The partnership has become a reality this year, and over the past few months, programs have started operating in the county.

UA News: UA Brings 2016 Rural Health Scholars to Campus

Two select groups of students from across Alabama recently were on The University of Alabama campus for the 2016 Rural Health Scholars and Rural Minority Health Scholars programs in UA’s College of Community Health Sciences.

WVUA: First Year UA Medical Students Serve Tuscaloosa Community

Before picking up their books and beginning medical school, first-year Alabama medical students committed a day doing good in the community.

As part of orientation week, incoming med students participated in “fun day,” a day of service in the Tuscaloosa community. This year’s fun day involved working in Jeremiah’s Community Garden, a place dedicated to providing food to anyone who needs it.

Partnership joins UA and Pickens County in improving rural community’s health and educating students

 

The University of Alabama has teamed up with Pickens County to provide learning opportunities for students while improving the health and wellbeing of the rural county of nearly 20,000.

The University of Alabama-Pickens County Partnership seeks to provide sustainable health care for the county and “real world” training for UA students in medicine, nursing, social work, psychology, health education and other disciplines. Students will gain practice from internships and other learning opportunities, while Pickens County will gain additional and needed health resources.

When it was feared that Pickens County Medical Center, a 56-bed hospital that has provided inpatient, outpatient and emergency care for the rural county since it opened in 1979, would close, members of the community took action.

They met with UA leaders, including Dr. Richard Streiffer, dean of the UA College of Community Health Sciences, and former president Dr. Judy Bonner, and what began as a discussion about how to keep the medical center open evolved into a conversation about sustaining health care in the county.

CCHS hosted a meeting in December 2014 that included Pickens County leaders and citizens and UA vice presidents and deans. The conversation centered on envisioning a new model of health care for the county via an academic-community partnership. The idea was coined a Health Care Teaching County.

“A health care teaching county is novel in that in that it provides help for a community and learning opportunities and experiences for students,” says Streiffer. “It will train future physicians and other health care providers where most will practice, and sustain health care in communities that most need it.”

In 2015, $600,000 was obtained from the Alabama Legislature to initiate the Partnership, and with CCHS as the coordinator, the funds will be used to support the Partnership in the following ways:

1. A Partnership Coordinator was hired. Wilamena Hopkins joined the Partnership in May 2016 as coordinator. Originally from rural Archer, Florida, Hopkins, studied health care management at UA and has worked as an event and training coordinator for Maude Whatley Health Services in Tuscaloosa.

“My role is to make sure the community is aware of the Partnership and understands the Partnership, and I’ll be making sure that we are headed in the right direction and that at the end of this year, funding will continue,” Hopkins says. “I will be making sure that we are introducing innovative ideas into the community and providing needed resources.”

2. A portion of funding obtained will support eight projects that address Pickens County health issues. Each project includes a UA faculty, UA student and a Pickens County community organization or similar entity.

Disseminating the Power PATH mental health preventive intervention to Pickens County Community Action Head Start Program
Principal Investigator: Dr. Caroline Boxmeyer, associate professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine at CCHS
Co PIs: Dr. Ansley Gilpin, assistant professor of psychology at UA, and Dr. Jason DeCaro, associate professor of anthropology
Collaboration: Pickens County Community Action Head Start Program

TelePlay: Connecting physicians, families and autism professionals to increase early autism identification in Pickens County
PI: Lea Yerby, assistant professor of Community and Rural Medicine at CCHS
Co PIs: Dr. Angela Barber, assistant professor of Communicative Disorders and the clinical research director of Autism Spectrum Disorders Clinic at UA
Collaboration: Dr. Julia Boothe, family medicine physician in Pickens County

Improving Pickens County Residents’ Knowledge of Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease and Type 2 Diabetes
PI: Dr. Michele Montgomery, assistant professor at the Capstone College of Nursing
Co PI:  Dr. Paige Johnson, assistant professor at the Capstone College of Nursing
Collaboration: Pickens County Community Action Committee & CDC, Inc., Pickens County Board of Education, Pickens County Head Start, and the Diabetes Coalition

Development of a Rural Family Medicine Residency in Pickens County
PI: Dr. Richard Friend, director of the College’s Family Medicine Residency
Collaboration: Jim Marshall, CEO of Pickens County Medical Center; Deborah Tucker, CEO of Whatley Health Services

Pickens County Medical-Legal Partnership for the Elderly
PI: Gaines B. Brake, staff attorney with the Elder Law Clinic at The University of Alabama School of Law
Collaboration: Jim Marshall, CEO of Pickens County Medical Center

Improving Access to Cardiac Rehabilitation Services in Pickens County
PI: Dr. Avani Shah, assistant professor of Social Work at UA
Co PI: Dr. Jonathan Wingo, associate professor of Kinesiology at UA
Collaboration: Sharon Crawford Wester, RRT, Cardiopulmonary Rehab Pickens County Medical Center

Alabama Literacy Project
PI: Carol A. Donovan, professor of special education and multiple abilities at UA
Collaboration: Jamie Chapman, Superintendent of Pickens County Schools

Bringing Healthy Food options and ease of preparation home to our senior adults
PI: Jennifer Anderson, director of Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at UA
Co PI: Suzanne Henson, dietitian and assistant professor in Family Medicine at CCHS
Collaboration: Anne Jones, Pickens County Family Center and Mayor Joe Lancaster, City of Carrollton, Alabama

 

3. The Partnership also sought recent UA graduates for one-year paid fellowships that provide opportunities to serve in health-related capacities in Pickens County. Four fellows joined the Partnership: August Anderson, Laura Beth Hurst, Courtney Rentas and Judson Russell.

They will spend time in Pickens County in community engagement and leadership development activities, which include seminars on health and public policy as well as social determinants of health. They will also work on projects throughout the year.

 

Across the country, rural hospitals struggle to survive. Since 2011, Alabama rural hospitals have closed in Florala, Elba, Clanton, Hartselle, Thomasville and Roanoke. Others cut services, notably obstetrical care.

Pickens County Medical Center, which is county-owned and located in Carrollton, Alabama, had seen layoffs and furloughs and had cut programs and reduced services over the years.

What makes this worse is that rural areas are in more need of health care, as their citizens are typically older, sicker and poorer.

In Pickens County, 27 percent of the population lives below the poverty line and health outcome rankings show that the county is 41st among the state’s 67 counties.

Learn more about the Partnership at cchs.ua.edu/pickenscounty.

Mini Med School series with OLLI continues

There are times patients might ask their doctors for medications and tests that might not be necessary and that could cause harm, according to Dr. Ray Brignac, a family medicine physician who practices at University Medical Center-Northport, which is operated by the College.

During a lecture that was part of the College’s Mini Medical School program with The University of Alabama’s OLLI program, Brignac said doctors and patients need to talk and to use evidence-based recommendations to make the best care decisions possible.

“You need to put as much research into your medical decisions as you do buying a car or a washing machine,” he said. “There’s a lot of information out there. Try to go where the evidence is.”

A national campaign called Choosing Wisely advocates just that. The campaign encourages doctors and patients to have conversations informed by evidence-based recommendations that facilitate good decisions about appropriate care based on a patient’s individual situation, and to avoid unnecessary medical tests, treatments and procedures.

“The Choosing Wisely campaign gives us good tools to be better informed and wiser,” said Brignac, who titled his lecture “Choosing Wisely in Geriatrics.”

OLLI, short for Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, is a member-led program educational program catering to those aged 50 years and older. The College’s Mini Medical School lecture series through OLLI provides an opportunity for OLLI members and community learners to explore trends in medicine and health and to receive important information about issues and advances in medicine and research.

Brignac presented on May 3, and Dr. Catherine Ikard, a physician at University Medical Center and UMC-Northport, presented on May 10.


Choosing Wisely in Geriatrics
Brignac said older people often have more medical conditions and, as a result, take more medications than younger people. While medications have benefits, they also carry risks. “Is it always wrong to take medications? No. But you need to exercise caution,” he said.

He noted that sleeping pills help with insomnia, which affects many people over the age of 60, but studies show increased falls by those taking sleeping pills. Antibiotics do not cure colds and have risks, including diarrhea and damage to nerves and tendons. Nutritional supplements have the potential to react with other medications. Narcotics are not always the best way to treat chronic pain and non-drug interventions like exercise and physical therapy are sometimes more  effective. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications like Aleve and Ibuprofen are safe but can sometimes cause gastrointestinal bleeding and increased risk of heart attack or stroke, and while acetaminophen, found in Tylenol, is a good medication, if taken in excess can damage the liver. Medications for heartburn and acid reflux can carry higher risk of osteoporosis, but sometimes avoiding certain foods and sleeping with the head of the bed raised can help.

“It’s not that you shouldn’t ever take these drugs, but you need to be aware of the risks,” Brignac said. “It’s always good to questions medications – are there alternatives, lower doses?”

Many older patients have low back pain and often ask for X-rays or MRIs, Brignac said. He recommends patients wait a month before tests because most back pain clears up in that time. “If you jump right into testing, you can create needless anxiety, or you might wind up under the surgeon’s knife unnecessarily.”

Brignac joined University Medical Center-Northport last year after a 34-year practice at Selma Medical Associates in Selma, Ala. In addition to family medicine, Brignac also has an interest in geriatrics and nursing home patients and is working to build a “hands-on” nursing home practice in Northport and Tuscaloosa.

Recognizing, Treating and Preventing Strokes
If you suspect someone you know is having a stroke, the most important information that can be relayed to the EMT or physician treating that person is the last known well time, said Dr. Catherine Ikard.  This will determine the course of treatment.

Ikard, assistant professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine and Internal Medicine, spoke about the causes, symptoms and treatments of strokes at a lecture she presented as part of the College’s Mini Medical School with The University of Alabama’s OLLI program.

OLLI, short for Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, is a member-led educational program catering to those aged 50 years or older. The College’s Mini Medical School lecture series through OLLI provides an opportunity for adults and community learners to explore trends in medicine and health, and the lectures by CCHS faculty offer important information about issues and advances in medicine and research.

One of the best ways to identify if someone might be having a stroke is to ask the person to smile. If the smile is lopsided or there is drooping, the person might be having a stroke, Ikard said.

If a stroke is caused by a blood clot, a medication called a tissue plasminogen activator, or tPA, may be given within four and a half hours of the last-known well time, said Ikard.

After four and a half hours, or if the patient cannot receive a tPA for medical reasons, endovascular therapy can be used, which involves the use of a stent retriever that a doctor routes through a catheter to the blocked artery and removes the clot, Ikard said.

“If you suspect a stroke, call 911,” Ikard said. “If it is a stroke, every 30 minute delay could lead to a 10 percent relative reduction in recovery.”

Coordinator of UA-Pickens County Partnership joins College

Wilamena Hopkins has joined the College of Community Health Sciences as the project coordinator for the UA-Pickens County Partnership, an effort that seeks to provide sustainable health care for the rural county and “real world” training for UA students.

The partnership of UA and Pickens County and its medical center will allow students in medicine, nursing, social work, psychology, health education and other UA disciplines to gain practice from internships and other learning opportunities in Pickens County, and the rural county will gain additional health resources.

Hopkins will be located primarily in Pickens County at its medical center and will direct and facilitate overall development, oversight implementation and administration for the project and serve as a liaison into the community and promote the partnership and its projects to the people of Pickens County and the UA community.

Approximately $600,000 was obtained from the Alabama Legislature in 2015 for the project, and the funds will be used for projects that address health needs in Pickens County, for fellows to serve in health-related capacities in Pickens County and for the project coordinator.

Four recent UA graduates have been selected for a one-year fellowship that will provide opportunities to serve in health-related capacities in Pickens County.

The projects that address an identifiable health issue or priority within the Pickens County community must involve UA faculty, students and a Pickens County community organization or similar entity.

The grant projects include:

1. Disseminating the Power PATH mental health preventive intervention to Pickens County Community Action Head Start Program
Principal Investigator: Dr. Caroline Boxmeyer, associate professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine at CCHS
Co PIs: Dr. Ansley Gilpin, assistant professor of psychology at UA, and Dr. Jason DeCaro, associate professor of anthropology
Collaboration: Pickens County Community Action Head Start Program

2. TelePlay: Connecting physicians, families and autism professionals to increase early autism identification in Pickens County
PI: Dr. Lea Yerby, assistant professor of Community and Rural Medicine at CCHS
Co PIs: Dr. Angela Barber, assistant professor of Communicative Disorders and the clinical research director of Autism Spectrum Disorders Clinic at UA
Collaboration: Dr. Julia Boothe, family medicine physician in Pickens County

3. Improving Pickens County Residents’ Knowledge of Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease and Type 2 Diabetes
PI: Dr. Michele Montgomery, assistant professor at the Capstone College of Nursing
Co PI:  Dr. Paige Johnson, assistant professor at the Capstone College of Nursing
Collaboration: Pickens County Community Action Committee & CDC, Inc., Pickens County Board of Education, Pickens County Head Start, and the Diabetes Coalition

4. Development of a Rural Family Medicine Residency in Pickens County
PI: Dr. Richard Friend, director of the College’s Family Medicine Residency
Collaboration: Jim Marshall, CEO of Pickens County Medical Center; Deborah Tucker, CEO of Whatley Health Services

5. Pickens County Medical-Legal Partnership for the Elderly
PI: Gaines B. Brake, staff attorney with the Elder Law Clinic at The University of Alabama School of Law
Collaboration: Jim Marshall, CEO of Pickens County Medical Center

6. Improving Access to Cardiac Rehabilitation Services in Pickens County
PI: Dr. Avani Shah, assistant professor of Social Work at UA
Co PI: Dr. Jonathan Wingo, associate professor of Kinesiology at UA
Collaboration: Sharon Crawford Wester, RRT, Cardiopulmonary Rehab Pickens County Medical Center

7. Alabama Literacy Project
PI: Carol A. Donovan, professor of special education and multiple abilities at UA
Collaboration: Jamie Chapman, Superintendent of Pickens County Schools

8. Bringing Healthy Food options and ease of preparation home to our senior adults
PI: Jennifer Anderson, director of Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at UA
Co PI: Suzanne Henson, dietitian and assistant professor in Family Medicine at CCHS
Collaboration: Anne Jones, Pickens County Family Center and Mayor Joe Lancaster, City of Carrollton, Alabama

 

College partner receives UA community engagement award

A Pickens County community organization and partner of the College of Community Health Sciences at The University of Alabama received a community engagement award from UA.

Buddy Kirk, Patti Presley-Fuller and Alan Harper, leaders of Friends of the Hospital in Pickens County, were awarded an Outstanding Community Partner-Initiated Engagement Effort Award last month.

Kirk is a retired attorney appointed by the Pickens County Commission to help the Pickens County Medical Center find a sustainable solution to its challenges. Presley-Fuller is County Extension coordinator for Pickens County. Alan Harper is a state representative whose district includes Pickens County.

Friends of the Hospital was created several years ago when Pickens County Medical Center was on the verge of closing. Like many rural hospitals across the country, the medical center was struggling to survive. Today, Friends of the Hospital and CCHS, as well as other UA colleges and schools, have partnered to create the Health Care Teaching County, a partnership involving Pickens County physicians and health care institutions and UA to address health care concerns in the county now and in the future.

“We recognize the efforts of students, faculty and community partners to move UA to the next level in engagement scholarship, working together as a team to make a difference in our communities and the lives of people living in those communities,” Dr. David Francko, UA’s associate provost and dean of the Graduate School, said during a luncheon to honor community engagement award recipients.

The idea behind the Health Care Teaching County partnership is to bring new energy and human capital to Pickens County, while providing useful training opportunities for students at UA. Students in medicine, nursing, social work, psychology, health education and other disciplines will gain practice from internships and other learning opportunities in Pickens County, and the rural county will gain additional health care and related resources.

Approximately $600,000 was obtained from the Alabama Legislature in 2015 for the project. To date, the funds have been used to hire a coordinator and four fellows for the partnership, and to fund seven UA-Pickens County proposals for health projects in the county. The fellows are receiving one-year paid fellowships that provide them an opportunity to serve in a health-related capacity in Pickens County and spend time in community engagement and leadership development activities.

Organizers of the partnership foresee overall improvement of health in the community and a possible boost in its economy as positive outcomes from the collaboration.

Pickens County is a Medically Underserved Area and a Primary Care, Mental Health and Dental Health Professional Shortage Area. The county ranks 41st in health outcomes among Alabama’s 67 counties.

 

 

Grants, fellows and coordinator selected for Health Care Teaching County Partnership

Grants have been funded, fellows have been named and a coordinator has been selected for The University of Alabama and Pickens County Health Care Teaching County Partnership.

The partnership of UA and Pickens County and its medical center seeks to provide sustainable health care for the rural county and “real world” training for UA students. Students in medicine, nursing, social work, psychology, health education and other UA disciplines will gain practice from internships and other learning opportunities in Pickens County, and the rural county will gain additional health resources.

Approximately $600,000 was obtained from the Alabama Legislature in 2015 for the project, and the funds will be used in three ways.

Grant Projects
The first is to fund projects that address an identifiable health issue/priority within the Pickens County community. The projects must involve UA faculty, students and a Pickens County community organization or similar entity.

1. Disseminating the Power PATH mental health preventive intervention to Pickens County Community Action Head Start Program
Principal Investigator: Dr. Caroline Boxmeyer, associate professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine at CCHS
Co PIs: Dr. Ansley Gilpin, assistant professor of psychology at UA, and Dr. Jason DeCaro, associate professor of anthropology
Collaboration: Pickens County Community Action Head Start Program

2. TelePlay: Connecting physicians, families and autism professionals to increase early autism identification in Pickens County
PI: Dr. Lea Yerby, assistant professor of Community and Rural Medicine at CCHS
Co PIs: Dr. Angela Barber, assistant professor of Communicative Disorders and the clinical research director of Autism Spectrum Disorders Clinic at UA
Collaboration: Dr. Julia Boothe, family medicine physician in Pickens County

3. Improving Pickens County Residents’ Knowledge of Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease and Type 2 Diabetes
PI: Dr. Michele Montgomery, assistant professor at the Capstone College of Nursing
Co PI:  Dr. Paige Johnson, assistant professor at the Capstone College of Nursing
Collaboration: Pickens County Community Action Committee & CDC, Inc., Pickens County Board of Education, Pickens County Head Start, and the Diabetes Coalition

4. Development of a Rural Family Medicine Residency in Pickens County
PI: Dr. Richard Friend, director of the College’s Family Medicine Residency
Collaboration: Jim Marshall, CEO of Pickens County Medical Center; Deborah Tucker, CEO of Whatley Health Services

5. Pickens County Medical-Legal Partnership for the Elderly
PI: Gaines B. Brake, staff attorney with the Elder Law Clinic at The University of Alabama School of Law
Collaboration: Jim Marshall, CEO of Pickens County Medical Center

6. Improving Access to Cardiac Rehabilitation Services in Pickens County
PI: Dr. Avani Shah, assistant professor of Social Work at UA
Co PI: Dr. Jonathan Wingo, associate professor of Kinesiology at UA
Collaboration: Sharon Crawford Wester, RRT, Cardiopulmonary Rehab Pickens County Medical Center

7. Alabama Literacy Project
PI: Carol A. Donovan, professor of special education and multiple abilities at UA
Collaboration: Jamie Chapman, Superintendent of Pickens County Schools

8. Bringing Healthy Food options and ease of preparation home to our senior adults
PI: Jennifer Anderson, director of Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at UA
Co PI: Suzanne Henson, dietitian and assistant professor in Family Medicine at CCHS
Collaboration: Anne Jones, Pickens County Family Center and Mayor Joe Lancaster, City of Carrollton, Alabama

Fellowships
The funding from the Alabama Legislature will also cover one-year fellowships for these recent UA graduates. Four fellows have been selected. The fellowships will provide an opportunity for them to serve in health-related capacities in Pickens County to both provide a year of service while expanding their experience and education.

Project Coordinator
Wilamena Hopkins has been named the coordinator of the UA and Pickens County Health Care Teaching County Project.

Hopkins, who has experience as an event and training coordinator for Whatley Health Services, will be located primarily in Pickens County. She will direct and facilitate overall development, oversight implementation and administration for the project and serve as a liaison into the community and promote the partnerships and its projects to the people of Pickens County and the University community.

Pickens County ranks 41st in health outcomes against Alabama’s 67 counties. The county has nine primary care physicians per 10,000 residents, and 36 percent of adults are considered obese. One-third of the population lives below the poverty line.